Posted by Irene Ojo-Felix | August 6th, 2019

Industry, Now

GREG KRELENSTEIN

GREG KRELENSTEIN

Portrait by Ben Hassett for Models.com

#IndustryNow The cycles of social media impel us to embrace then move on from trends and discourses faster than ever before. The life span of a single work––an editorial, a campaign, a show, a stint––is shorter for it. Fashion’s only unconditional term is the future: operating a year ahead, after all. So, in an industry where change and relevancy are the full stops at the end of every sentence, Models.com wanted to highlight individuals who add permanence to the community–some at their start and some at their top. Photographer Ben Hassett gets up close and personal for Models.com with the creative forces often behind the scenes. They are the Industry, Now.

Since Hollywood’s inception, the radiant star power that celebrities bring has only risen to a blindingly bright transmission. The art of connecting these VIPs with the fashion photographers and publications that matter is one that casting director Greg Krelenstein has mastered with flourishing dexterity. Krelenstein has had the responsibility of harnessing the fever pitch towards virality, booking the established and up-and-coming talents that are sure to make the covers they are featured on sell. For over a decade, he has operated as the master negotiator for niche publications like V, LOVE, Dazed, AnOther and Garage Magazine who all rely on his ability to deliver the unexpected.

Have the reasons you started doing what you do changed along the way?
I don’t think so, it’s always exciting to discover and introduce new talent to the publications and brands and re-imagine more established ones with different creatives and teams.

What was the turning point in your career?
The turning point of my career was probably after I booked Another Magazine’s series of covers and portraits for the Decade of Style issue. There were so many high profile talent and photographers involved it was probably the most challenging assignment I had to that point. I needed to honor both their vision for high profile talent but also go beyond what they had already done. A lot of those portraits have lived on in exhibitions and other media and once that was over, it only hammered home the point that you should always send the request.

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