Magdalena Frackowiak

May 15th, 2015

Models.com’s ICONS: Magdalena

Expressing her creative talents, Polish stunner Magdalena Frackowiak decided to transcend her modeling career and start a new venture with her eponymous jewelry line. Cultivating a modern, refined aesthetic Frackowiak designed a 26-piece, 18-carat gold collection with Polish artisans who worked the metal into textured, unique shapes. Her love of architecture, fine art and more than a decade of working in fashion has allowed for her to finally illustrate a vision that is as edgy as it is classic. Her debut collection ranges in price from 1,000 to 10,000 euros, and is available exclusively at www.magdalenafrackowiak.com.

Take a peek at our exclusive first look at her line and an interview with the new designer.

Photography by Alique for Models.com
Magdalena Frackowiak / DNA
Styled by Maher Jridi
Make up by Hung Vanngo
Hair by Eric Jamieson (BRIDGE Artists)
Creative direction Stephan Moskovic
Production Kegan Webb

Interview by Janelle Okwodu
Intro by Irene Ojo-Felix

When was the first time you got interested in jewelry?

I’ve always been interested in architecture. I am particularly fascinated by the study of forms, shapes and geometry. Ten years ago when I began working in fashion, I came to notice how a wonderful piece of jewelry is so more impactful than any other accessory. To me, each piece is like wearing a small sculpture. So while I can trace my initial interest in jewelry to my earliest love of aesthetics, the desire to create my own pieces blossomed as I came to love and understand fashion.

What made you want to create your own line?

Designing my own jewelry line encompasses both my desire to be creative and my love of art. Each tiny creation holds sentiment, meaning and a sense of history for the person wearing it. I especially love that the emotional significance of a piece of jewelry can resonate through many generations.

“I especially love that the emotional significance of a piece of jewelry can resonate through many generations.”

How do you describe the feeling of the collection?

I describe my designs as elegant, but each piece also exudes a certain sensuality. Gold is the only compound I am using at the moment. It’s strong and timeless.The particular shade of gold I use in my line is my signature. When I was coming up with my original designs, I did a few tests of various percentages of different metals such as silver, cooper and pure gold. I mixed them in a way that gives me a distinctive color, somewhere between rose and gold. It’s warm shade of gold.. The 18-carat gold color I use is unique to my brand.

The gold is finished, by hand, with traditional techniques, such as pressing, cutting and hammering. The shapes are modern, geometric and refined, but the individual details make each piece a unique work of art.

One of the things I really love about the collection is the heaviness. The designs are minimal but the weight of the pieces is substantial. I have an 18-carat gold bracelet that weights over 30 grams. I love the feeling of weight.

Also, many of the pieces can be worn by either men or women. For instance, the heavy tube rings, bracelets and spike broaches express a simplicity and strength that suits either gender.

How has your fashion background influenced you as a designer?

I’ve had the great honor of working with some of the most incredible creative minds in fashion. Of course, these experiences have shaped my eye and my aesthetic. I am attuned to the importance of creating pieces that enhance the beauty of the wearer.

“I am attuned to the importance of creating pieces that enhance the beauty of the wearer.”

I’ve also been influenced by the work of visual artists such as Antoni Tapies, Richard Serra, Man Ray, Serge Lutens and Louise Bourgeois. You can see the influence of these artists in my jewelry.

What was it like doing an editorial in pieces you designed?

I was thrilled to wear my pieces for an editorial.. But at the end of the day, I am designing my jewelry not for myself but for other people to wear. My greatest source of pride is noticing someone else wearing my jewelry and seeing the beauty and polish it adds to their look.

Which pieces do you feel everybody should have?

I think everybody should own a ring and keep it as a talisman. A ring can complement your look and also elevate your mood. To me, rings are one of the most personal items of jewelry a person can own. In my collection, I offer a selection of rings in a variety of surface treatments, styles and thicknesses. I feel everyone would like to have a ring that is special and unique to them.

“I think everybody should own a ring and keep it as a talisman. A ring can complement your look and also elevate your mood.”

What is the piece of jewelry that you simply cannot live without?

I love a broach. I don’t see many people wearing them, but I own many that were passed on to me from my grandmother. I am so fond of them that I have designed two for my collection: a spiky brooch and a round one. Both come in different sizes. I love to wear two at a time pinned to a sweater or a hat.

I heard all the pieces are done in Poland, why?

First of all, I am Polish. Also, I work on the project with my best friend, Maja Clara Stepien, who lives in Warsaw. We’ve been able to find incredible young artisans and older craftsmen in Poland. Each one brings great experience and talent to the project — everything from helping us create the jewelry, to the packaging. Without their craftsmanship none of this would be possible.

“We’ve been able to find incredible young artisans and older craftsmen in Poland. Each one brings great experience and talent to the project.”

How would you describe your creative process?

When I design, I first see the shape in my mind. Then I sketch the idea. After that, our jewelers carve a pro model in wax or in silver. Every piece is carved by hand, not by the machine. We also don’t use any computers in the creation of my line. I am a visual person so I do a lot of refining of the design on those initial models. I am always looking for the perfect balance in my pieces, and that takes time and attention to detail. I will go back and forth with my jewelers a few times working on a single piece. Sometimes the changes we make might be as tiny as a millimeter. To me, it makes all the difference.

Related posts:

Posted in Cover story, Features, Interviews, Parallax | 5 Comments »