First Look: Document Journal

April 29th, 2016 |Posted by steven.yatsko

The soon-to-be-out S/S ’16 issue of Document Journal is a who’s who of the here and now, and if the 8 covers fronted by fashion’s royalty like Hedi Slimane and Grace Coddington didn’t tip you off, then here’s the inside to take you there. Between the amusing and uncommon imaginings of collaborators like Willy Vanderperre and Olivier RizzoColin Dodgson and Joe McKennaRoe Ethridge and Robbie Spencer to the pleasurably picturesque–like Coco Capitan‘s unassuming take on Lena Hardt or Venetia Scott‘ suburban-backdropped portraits styled by Sarah Richardson, there’s probably nowhere better to be. Starting now, Richardson will be the magazines new fashion director. Casting goes full out too, to good effect thanks to Piergiorgio Del Moro and Samuel Ellis Scheinman: models Stella TennantRianne van RompaeyAlice MetzaEstella Boersma plus more, use their respective demand to bring the issue to the far side of choicest. See below an exclusive Models.com preview of the issue before it hits stands.

 

Document Journal will be on sale the first week of May exclusively at Dover Street New York, BookMarc New York, Iconic Magazines New York, Dover Street London, Broken Arm Paris, Colette, 0FR Paris and 10 Corso Como Milan, and available worldwide the following week. Preorder copies at documentjournal.myshopify.com.

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Stella Tennant by Willy Vanderperre (Art + Commerce) | Stylist Olivier Rizzo | Hair Anthony Turner (Art Partner) | Makeup Lynsey Alexander (Streeters London) | Manicurist Anatole Rainey (Premier Hair and Make-Up)


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Rianne van Rompaey and Natalie Westling by Colin Dodgson (Art Partner) | Stylist Joe McKenna (Art Partner) | Hair Akki Shirakawa (Art Partner) | Makeup Miranda Joyce (Streeters London) | Manicurist Marian Newman (Streeters London) | Casting Piergiorgio Del Moro (Exposure NY) and Samuel Ellis Scheinman

 


 

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Catharina Pedersen and Connor Newall by Venetia Scott (Camilla Lowther Management) | Stylist Sarah M Richardson | Hair Ali Pirzadeh (Camilla Lowther Management) | Makeup Sharon Dowsett (Camilla Lowther Management) | Casting Beth Dubin


 

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Katherine MooreLexi Boling and Taylor Hill by Roe Ethridge | Stylist Robbie Spencer | Hair Tomo Jidai (Streeters London) | Makeup Francelle Daly (Art + Commerce) | Lighting Sam Nixon


 

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Anne Catherine Lacroix by Robi Rodriguez (Management + Artists) | Stylist Camille Bidault Waddington (Management + Artists) | Hair Chi Wong (Management + Artists) | Makeup Nami Yoshida | Manicurist Sophy Robson (Streeters London)| Set Polly Philp | Casting Piergiorgio Del Moro (Exposure NY)


 

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Estella Boersma by Mark Peckmezian (London: Webber Represents, New York: Webber Represents ) | Stylist Jodie Barnes (rep) | Hair Tomohiro Ohashi (Management + Artists) | Makeup Christine Corbel (Management + Artists) | Casting Samuel Ellis Scheinman


 

 

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Staz LindesLili Sumner and Alice Metza by Richard Bush | Stylist Sarah M Richardson | Hair Martin Cullen (Streeters London) | Makeup Georgina Graham (Management + Artists)


 

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Rianne van Rompaey by Glen Luchford (Art Partner | Hair Anthony Turner (Art Partner) | Makeup Lucia Pieroni (London: Streeters London, Los Angeles: Streeters Los Angeles, New York: Streeters New York) | Manicurist Elsa Durrens (New York: ArtList NY, Paris: ArtList Paris) | Set Valerie Weill | Lighting Jack Webb


 

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Lena Hardt by Coco Capitan (Creative and Partners) | Stylist Elodie David Touboul (New York: ArtList NY, Paris: ArtList Paris) | Casting Piergiorgio Del Moro (Exposure NY)


 

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Christopher Fernandez and Sheck by Benedict Brink | Stylist Ronald Burton III | Grooming Dana Boyer


 

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Estella Boersma by Pierre Debusschere (New York: Art + Commerce, New York: Art + Commerce) | Stylist Pieter Mulier and Matthieu Blazy | Hair Tomohiro Ohashi (Management + Artists) | Casting Samuel Ellis Scheinman

 

Posted in: General news

Dazed’s Power Play

April 22nd, 2016 |Posted by Irene Ojo-Felix

2016’s most striking figures are championing power and protest and Dazed is commemorating this vital moment with five covers. Abbey Lee, Anohni, Anna Ewers, Grace Wales Bonner, and Paul Hameline are lensed by photographers Paolo Roversi, Willy Vanderperre, Torbjorn Rodland, and Harley Weir in a series of disruptive truth-telling. The covers arrive at a time when finding strength through self-determination has never been more public. Go inside the Spring/Summer issue and visit themes of ‘women supporting women’, ‘abuse’, ‘self-reliance’ and ‘love’ through the eyes of fashion’s newest elite.

Pick up your copy of Dazed SS16 on newsstands today!

Text by Derrick Gaitér | Pictures courtesy of Dazed

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Posted in: General news

Modern Day Rebels

March 4th, 2016 |Posted by steven.yatsko

Issue 4 of Re-Edition Magazine declares “We have everything and we have nothing” (by way of Bukowski) and with that obscure aphorism offers up its ink to the foremost underground talents who stay true to their own nonconformist roots.  Six covers so seemingly simple they’re beyond any traces of superficiality. With Re-Edition, content is king and creative forces like Willy VanderperreHarley WeirCollier Schorr, Mark BorthwickRobbie SpencerLotta Volkova and designer Gosha Rubchinskiy see to that in a respective effort. Casting underlines the lesser seen, but captures the defining spirit of the modern day rebel. The styling’s rakish, the faces are unique and the visuals equal it all–everything and nothing, too.

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By Willy Vanderperre (Art + Commerce)


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Casil McArthur by Collier Schorr | Stylist Robbie Spencer


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Marland Backus by Mark Borthwick (Print & Contact)


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Hannah Quinlan Anderson by Dan Giuliani | Stylist Jo Barker


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Gosha Rubchinskiy


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By Harley Weir (Art Partner) | Stylist Lotta Volkova (Management + Artists)


 

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Suzi Leenaars by Harley Weir (Art Partner) | Stylist Lotta Volkova (Management + Artists)


 

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Caroline Clante by Johnny Dufort | Stylist Lotta Volkova (Management + Artists)


 

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Gosha Rubchinskiy


 

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Marland Backus by Mark Borthwick (Print & Contact)


 

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Willy Vanderperre (Art + Commerce)


 

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Casil McArthur by Collier Schorr | Stylist Robbie Spencer


 

Posted in: General news

First Look: Document Journal

October 1st, 2015 |Posted by steven.yatsko

In the latest volume of Document Journal, stylist Olivier Rizzo delivers his magic touch, guest editing the magazine into a full on fashion folio with some of photography’s brightest stars and a who’s who cast of intriguing lens-worthy faces. The twelve, Rizzo-styled covers give a swatch sized glimpse into the accompanying editorials by Jamie HawkesworthCraig McDean, Wolfgang TillmansHarley WeirAlasdair McLellan and a whopping 7 by Willy Vanderperre. Editors Nick Vogelson & James Valeri‘s issue preface introduces Rizzo’s significance by saying, “His ingrained devotion to beauty— unconventional, sometimes ugly, and at times simple—led us to him, and him to us, as Document’s guest editor for this issue.” Inside, the exhaustive Vanderperre stories put on display his singularly cool perspective, while other majorly aesthetic imaginings, like Gareth McConnell‘s low-fi, hyper pop pictures or McDean’s fine-tuned shots of Lexi Boling, give another take on what’s current. Take an exclusive first look into the encompassing Olivier Rizzo edited issue with all 12 covers.

Images courtesy of Document Journal

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By Harley Weir (Art Partner) / Hair by Guido Palau (Art + Commerce)


 

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Eliina, Miikael, Erik at M Models by Jamie Hawkesworth / Stylist Olivier Rizzo / Hair Anthony Turner (Art Partner) / Makeup Peter Philips (Art + Commerce)


 

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Harleth Kuusik by Alasdair McLellan (Art Partner) / Stylist Olivier Rizzo / Hair Anthony Turner (Art Partner) / Makeup Lynsey Alexander (Streeters London) / Manicurist Lyndsay McIntosh (Premier Hair and Make-Up) / Casting Madeleine Østlie


 

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Lexi Boling by Craig McDean (Art + Commerce) / Stylist Olivier Rizzo / Hair Jimmy Paul / Makeup Hannah Murray (Art + Commerce) / Manicurist Elle


 

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Liam Gardner, Hayett McCarthy and Poppy Okotcha by Gareth McConnell / Stylist James Valeri (Home Agency) / Hair Chi Wong / Makeup Kirstin Piggott (New York: Julian Watson Agency NY, London: Julian Watson Agency London) & Pep Gay (London: Streeters London, New York: Streeters New York)


 

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Rianne van Rompaey  by Willy Vanderperre (Art + Commerce) / Stylist Olivier Rizzo / Hair Anthony Turner (Art Partner) / Makeup Peter Philips (Art + Commerce) / Casting Director Ashley Brokaw


 

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Julia Nobis  by Willy Vanderperre (Art + Commerce) / Stylist Olivier Rizzo / Hair Anthony Turner (Art Partner) / Makeup Peter Philips (Art + Commerce) / Casting Director Ashley Brokaw


 

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Greta Varlese  by Willy Vanderperre (Art + Commerce) / Stylist Olivier Rizzo / Hair Anthony Turner (Art Partner) / Makeup Peter Philips (Art + Commerce) / Casting Director Ashley Brokaw


 

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Finnlay Davis & Alice Metza by Willy Vanderperre (Art + Commerce) / Stylist Olivier Rizzo / Hair Anthony Turner (Art Partner) / Makeup Peter Philips (Art + Commerce) / Casting Director Ashley Brokaw


 

 

Posted in: General news

A New Hope

April 1st, 2015 |Posted by steven.yatsko

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As Man About Town, the bi-annual men’s fashion and lifestyle publication, releases its Spring/Summer 2015 issue tomorrow entitled A NEW HOPE, one gets the feeling this new generation is predestined to set the stage for a social renaissance. On the multiple covers shot by Alasdair McLellan a prepossessing Bjorn stands semi-gawk semi-sophisticate with styling by Olivier Rizzo that is democratic in its androgyny. For the issue, the exclusive previews of AW 15 Gucci, J.W. Anderson, Raf Simons, and Prada match MAT’s pitch perfect breed of meta-decadal fingerprinting.

We spoke to Ben Reardon, the editor-in-chief of Man About Town, recently to get personal insight and some cultural forecasting. After a stint at British GQ Style and i-D before that, he’s found familiar terra firma at Man –the independent magazine world being a language more native to him.  Ben understands that the the editor’s compass is always shifting following cultural zeitgeists. 

Photos courtesy of Man About Town

S: We met while you were at British GQ Style, and before then it was I-D. Now you’re the editor-in-chief of Man About Town. What attracted you there?

B: The idea of a return to independent publishing and the freedom that entails was really appealing. I learnt so much at i-D, it wasn’t just a job, and it was more like family at a pivotal time in my life. I still think of Terry and Tricia Jones, the founders of i-D, as my second parents. After seven years it was time for a new challenge and I had always wanted to experience work within the incredible world of Condé Nast. The thought of bridging the gap between the mainstream and counter-culture always appeals to me. I was very proud of the work we achieved there: commissioning Inez and Vinoodh to shoot James Franco as Adam Ant, Juergen Teller to go to Noma, the best restaurant in the world, Alasdair McLellan to shoot One Direction’s first ever editorial, Harmony Korine to shoot his first ever fashion story, pairing Gus Van Sant with the genius stylist Panos Yiapanis and Terry Richardson shooting the guys from Game of Thrones, Breaking Bad and Sons of Anarchy to celebrate a golden age of TV. My final cover was Pharrell just on the stratospheric upturn of his career, wearing Jake and Dinos Chapman for Kim Jones at Louis Vuitton with cover graphics by Fergadelic–the designer who I currently work with at Man About Town. These were all big moments and felt genuinely exciting to broker under the GQ banner.

But I have an independent aesthetic at heart and a deep-rooted love of the young and the new, all of which can be fully realised at Man About Town. The only constraints here are what I can make happen. From issue 1, it was about turning a good, functioning magazine into something relevant and vital. Brooklyn Beckham’s first ever, editorial story was a punt I wanted to take for my first cover. I loved the idea of the words ‘Man’ and ‘Boy’ written closely together on the cover, extending the remit of how menswear was delivered editorially. The punt paid off–those images went global, featured across the global news media, on talk shows and breakfast TV. They set a news agenda for a week, something you can’t often do at a fashion magazine. It was just a boy in a school uniform, but it delivered a very explicit fashion message that was British, simple, elegant and in tune with its times. Sometimes the pressure is daunting, but I purposefully wanted to open a door into a new vocabulary in menswear.

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S: Can you describe to me any cultural drifts, things more substantial than a trend, that may be informing some of what you put into the magazine in terms of content and talent?

B: I attend the fashion shows each season in London, Florence, Milan then finishing in Paris. These are when buyers, editors, stylists and journalists see the clothes and concepts we will be working with the following season, which we then have to digest, process and translate to the reader. The way that I work is very instinctive. I rely on my cultural awareness and set a theme accordingly. The team then tries to understand my random thought process and hopefully incorporates fashion into something wider and more meaningful than a selection of garments. A lot of care and thought goes into everything from the graphics to the titles, the teams paired and the journalism. I believe the written word, paired with a great photograph, inspired styling and a brilliant title graphic can be explosive. I believe in printed matter and always will. It’s still the best way of organizing thought when executed correctly.

S: Do you have any process for cultivating your intuitions in this scope – or gathering inspiration?

B: When I was growing up the Internet wasn’t around. It was a time before everything was readily available. So you had to rely on libraries to read books, charity shops for clothes and markets for records and fanzines. The first fashion magazine that I actually bought was Kurt Cobain on the cover of The Face. I was going on holiday with my mum and dad and it was in the airport. I was 14, at the awkward age when you hate everything. I was in a hot country and stayed in the shadows, reading that magazine from cover to cover time and time again. Seeing fashion photography for the first time blew my mind. You pick at the seams of culture now and things fall apart. The only thing we have left in an age of shared information and aesthetic overload is the intimate specifics of someone’s taste. I try to hang a lot of those thoughts together in magazines because that feels like their magic to me.

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S: Reading and looking at your work, I get a feeling that your intentions are to produce work that feels more regional and colloquial. That there’s value in that context. Have you ever thought about this?   

B: The previous issue of MAT was specifically themed around the idea Is Britain Still Great? It was put together at a shifting, scary, weird time politically in Britain and we wanted to address it. We spent the summer travelling around the UK, finding beauty and interest in small local stories and tackling politics along the way. There was a genuine feeling back in the office when we assembled the stories that we’d achieved something more thoughtful than just another magazine about menswear. To care and to give something depth resonates more, hopefully. We chose Jack O’Connell as the cover star as for me he represents a particular British localism, albeit one that is translating to a world stage. He’s the handsome wag who lives down the street that just happens to be super-talented. He’s won a Bafta and bagged a Prada campaign whilst the magazine is still on the shelves. Again, we felt like he said something more than just being a nice face in nice clothes.

S: Where did you grow up and what were you interested in as a boy? 

B: I grew up in Newport, South Wales. When I was growing up everyone was in a band. NME labelled Newport the new Seattle. Donna from Elastica went to my school. Everyone drank at the local club called, The Legendary TJs, where Kurt Cobain proposed to Courtney Love and the Manic Street Preachers hung out. TJ’s was pivotal to me in every way. Dressing up and getting the bus into town was an event there. My sister loved The Smiths and Morrissey, so Morrissey has always been a constant throughout my life. We listened to Hatful of Hollow in my dad’s car, cut out posters from magazines to paper her walls with and I wore her boy-sucking-a-lollipop Smiths tee for my non-uniform day in Junior School. When I was aged 14, Morrissey played support to David Bowie in Cardiff, I was so excited I puked all over myself. So, Morrissey. It has always been Morrissey. And it will always be Morrissey. Who else is there?

S: Have you ever had any odd jobs?

B: The jobs I did like stacking shelves and working in an off-license were to supplement me doing work placement at magazines whilst studying at Art College. I met Rachel Newsome, who was then Editor at Dazed and Confused, and worked there for a year, editing the Eye Spy pages at the front of the book, previously edited by Nicola Formichetti. Katy England and Alister Mackie would visit the office and it would be a sensation seeing in person people who I had studied the work of for so long. A job at i-D was advertised in the Guardian. I applied, was interviewed by Terry Jones, got the job and later became editor.

S: Are there any personal obsessions that you inject into your work? I know you’re wild about at least a few things.

B: Morrissey and David Lynch are the two constants. They’re there in pretty much everything I do, explicitly or implicitly. They informed my taste at a crucial age. You can never run away from that.

S: I think you’re really great at pairing talent, sometimes finding obscure fixings. What’s your objective when building the team for a project?

B: It has to be more than just a model, a photograph and some clothes. It goes back to people caring. I value knowledge and intuition. The people I collaborate with are experts in their fields. You can’t force someone to take a picture otherwise it becomes so bland and catalogue. I think when worlds collide and things clash, then you get brilliant results. The high and the low is always a tense, interesting mix.

S: Who would be your dream team?

B: I’m lucky to say that I only work with people I love and admire. Having said that, I would love to meet and work with Bruce Weber one day. The world he creates with his pictures is one I would love to inhabit.

S: Are there any models you would use over and over again?

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B: I love Lara Stone. Her face and attitude evokes European cinema and she always creates an interesting character. She can turn from submissive to aggressive, from sex to restrained in the curl of a lip or furrow of her brow. And she is, when all’s said and done, a breathtaking beauty.

S: Especially for this previous issue of Man About Town, you worked closely with Alasdair McLellan. What are your favorite elements of his work in-and-out of the fashion medium?

B: It’s very personal with Alasdair, we trust each other. It’s a pleasure to work with him. It’s not just taking a fashion image; it’s about finding talent, an oddness, a narrative and a story. We share very similar references and Alasdair knows pop culture like nobody I have ever met. He has an encyclopedic knowledge of obscure facts and figures related to the charts, 60s kitchen sink dramas, Morrissey lyrics, scenes in Star Wars and he uses this to create characters in a world that is just his. And he makes it all seem so effortless. His pictures look like beautiful stills from the most amazing film you have never seen. It’s always very British, sometimes dour and with a touch of sadness, but always with great elegance and sophistication. His expert hand is like no other and I am beyond proud to call him my friend.

S: Has the British aesthetic resurged in prevalence?

B: There’s a new wave of super exciting image makers coming through in London, as an editor, it’s an exciting time with a host of new photographers and stylists to collaborate with. They all share some esoteric similarities, making work that is very personal, arty, weird, wrong, sexual, staged, sincere and very British. I guess it’s the first time since Alasdair that we’re watching a new wave coming through which is always inspiring to see.

S: How has the landscape of the fashion industry, men’s in particular, changed over the last decade?

B: There’s a lot more of it and it’s gotten much busier, with London Collections Men’s added to the schedule and now New York Men’s fashion week being spoken of. The process of editing so much visual information down to a coherent thought has become even more of the most beautiful headache.

S: What’s your favorite film?

B: Star Wars. Always.

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All 4 covers, Bjorn by Alasdair McLellan (Art Partner) /  Styling by Olivier Rizzo

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Shane and Hamish Frew by Alasdair McLellan (Art Partner) /  Styling by Olivier Rizzo / Hair by Matt Mulhall (Streeters London) / Makeup by Ninni Nummela (Streeters London)

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Photography by Mike O’Meally

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Michael by Alasdair McLellan (Art Partner) / Hair by Malcolm Edwards (Art Partner) / Makeup by Lynsey Alexander (Streeters London)

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Harry by Letty Schmiterlow / Styling by Danny Reed

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Finnlay Davis by Jamie Hawkesworth / Styling by Jonathan Anderson / Hair and grooming by Gary Gill

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Hugo, Jules and Marko at Rebel by Gosha Rubchinskiy / Styling by Lotta Volkova Adam (New York: ArtList NY, Paris: ArtList Paris) / Hair and grooming by Gary Gill

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Jeremie Renier by Willy Vanderperre (Art + Commerce) / Hair by Anthony Turner (Art Partner) /  Grooming by Lynsey Alexander (Streeters London)

Posted in: General news

The New Gen

March 27th, 2015 |Posted by Irene Ojo-Felix

The spring issue of i-D is dedicated to Generation Z and the creatives that use their platform to promote positive change in the world. Shot by Willy Vanderperre (Art + Commerce) cover model Natalie Westling gives a 90s grunge aura in an oversized camouflage jacket and minimal makeup on the latest cover of i-D‘s magazine. Flame-haired, self-proclaimed “tomboy” Westling talks with a poise beyond her 18 years about LGBT rights and maintaining her cool while working in the industry.

The newest generation of exciting faces are on the forefront with editorials starring Lida Fox & Karolin Wolter. Take a look at some the images below and figure out “what do you stand for?”

All photos courtesy of i-D. To see more visit i-D.com

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Natalie Westling, photographer Willy Vanderperre (Art + Commerce), fashion director Alastair McKimm (Art + Commerce), hair Duffy (Streeters London), makeup Lynsey Alexander (Streeters London), nail technician Charlene Coquard (Paris: ArtList Paris, New York: ArtList NY), casting Angus Munro for AM Casting (Los Angeles: Streeters Los Angeles, New York: Streeters New York)

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Karolin Wolter (image 1: Balmain, Commes des Garcons, MSGM, Yohji Yamamoto, Givenchy by Riccardo Tisci stud; image 2: Craig Green, Lanvin, Sonia Rykiel, Emilio Cavallini, Katherine Hamnett) photographer Christian MacDonald, styling Jacob K (Streeters London), hair Luke Hersheson, makeup Petros Petrohilos (Streeters London), casting Angus Munro for AM Casting (Los Angeles: Streeters Los Angeles, New York: Streeters New York)

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Lida Fox all in Celine, bodysuit by Wolford, Roe Ethridge, styling Marie Chaix (Art Partner), hair Jordan M, makeup Seong Hee Park, nail technician Elena Capo, lighting Chris Bisagni, production Felix Frith

Posted in: General news

Raf Reflects

January 20th, 2015 |Posted by Janelle

Image juxtapositions are de rigueur in fashion campaigns lately, but no this season one pulls it off quite as well as Willy Vanderperre does in the new ads for Raf Simons. Simons’ S/S15 collection was itself an ode to image pairings and moodboards so the concept seems fitting. With Luca Lemaire serving as the collection’s poster boy and the richly detailed pieces providing visual interest from every angle, Vanderperre shows all sides of the collage influenced look. The strength of these shots lies in their simplicity and Vanderperre succeeds in making even the most complex pieces seem minimal.

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Posted in: General news

#AnOtherObsession

September 3rd, 2014 |Posted by Janelle

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Ph. Alasdair McLellan (Art Partner)

If your fall magazine perusal has suffered from a lack of Kate Moss never fear AnOther Magazine is here to satisfy all your Moss needs. The always on the pulse publication understands that too much Moss is never enough and no matter how many guises the supermodel wears the fashion crowd will always want more. It’s this insatiable need for Moss that has made Kate girl most wanted for two decades and on the 10th anniversary of Moss’ first appearance on AnOther’s cover the mag serves up an all-Kate special that taps into Moss’ versatility and innate cool. Alasdair McLellan (Art Partner), Willy Vanderperre (Art Partner), Collier Schorr and Craig McDean shoot four covers each showcasing a different side of Moss’ allure – take a look at the eye-catching covers and a first peek at accompanying editorials.

Kate Moss Never Enough on AnotherMag.com


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Kate Moss shot and styled by Alasdair McLellan and Alister Mackie for AnOther Magazine Autumn / Winter, on sale Thursday 4th September

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Kate Moss shot and styled by Willy Vanderperre and Oliver Rizzo for AnOther Magazine Autumn / Winter, on sale Thursday 4th September.

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Kate Moss shot and styled by by Collier Schorr and Katy England for AnOther Magazine Autumn / Winter, on sale Thursday 4th September.

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Kate Moss shot and styled by Craig McDean and Olivier Rizzo for AnOther Magazine Autumn / Winter, on sale Thursday 4th September.

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