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Past Meets Present: The Mod Moment

January 23rd, 2013 |Posted by Janelle

By its very nature, fashion is in a constant state of change, but the industry has a way of rehashing the past every few seasons with collections that draw inspiration from key moments in fashion’s history.  Nostalgia was the predominant fashion mode of the aughts, and it saw  designers revisiting everything from 1920s flapper fixtures, to ’80s powerdressing and (gasp) ’90s grunge redux. We may have just entered into 2013, but when it comes to manufacturing clothing that looks awfully similar to styles that could have been worn generations earlier, designers show no signs of stopping.

Case in point, S/S 13′s mod moment, which saw a wealth of graphic prints invading the runway. Checks, stripes, and houndstooth patterns  made appearances on the runways of labels like Marc Jacobs, Louis Vuitton, Prada, Michael Kors and Dolce & Gabbana, offering a pleasant alternative to spring’s tried-and-true florals and providing a bit of deja vu. Granted, these design elements are timeless, but fans of ’60s style will recognize the cuts and patterns that make up these new designs as the hallmarks of mod innovators. Take a look at  the work of Pierre Cardin, Mary Quant, André Courrèges, and Ossie Clark,  and you can’t help but see where Marc Jacobs and co. took their lead from.

With the very same designs getting major play in the pages of this month’s magazines, editors have been showcasing these looks in a variety of ways. Most choose to play up the retro appeal inherent in these collections by creating stories reminiscent of days past: what says ’60s more than an angular Vidal Sasson bob or an oversized bouffant? Others focus in on the graphic element, shooting the pieces against white backdrops and playing up the contrast.

 

PAST

Designer Ossie Clark and one of his creations

Models in Who Are You Polly Magoo, 1966

Houndstooth Coat, Ph. Art Kane, 1966

Designs by Andre Courreges,


PRESENT

Vogue Japan | Ph. Emma Summerton | Styling Patti Wilson | Model Aymeline Valade | Makeup Dotti


American Vogue | Ph. Steven Klein | Styling Grace Coddington | Models Carolyn Murphy and Karen Elson


Harper’s Bazaar | Ph. Greg Harris | Stylist Tony Irvine | Model Marte Mei van Haaster | Hair Akki Shirakawa | Makeup Pep Gay

Marte Mei van Haaster in Louis VuittonMarc Jacobs and Michael Kors


Harper’s Bazaar Spain Ph. Txema Yeste | Styling Melania Pan | Model Ginta Lapina | Hair Olivier Lebrun (See Management) | Makeup Christopher Kam

Ginta Lapina in Louis VuittonDolce & Gabbana & Michael Kors


Vogue Japan Ph. Victor Demarchelier (Paris: Management + Artists, New York: Management + Artists) | Styling Sabino Pantone | Model Jessica Stam | Hair Didier Malige | Makeup Adrien Pinault (Paris: Management + Artists, New York: Management + Artists)

Stam inLouis Vuitton & Acne


Vogue China Ph. Daniel Jackson | Styling Nicoletta Santoro | Models Kel Markey, Agnés Nabuurs, Athena Wilson, Bo Don & Chiharu Okunugi | Hair Yannick D’Is (Paris: Management + Artists, New York: Management + Artists) | Makeup Yadim

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Double Vision : Saint Laurent Paris

January 9th, 2013 |Posted by Janelle

Hedi Slimane’s dramatic rebranding of Yves Saint Laurent was one of the most divisive collections in recent memory; everyone had an opinion, some more hotly debated than others. While many found Slimane’s changes to be completely in line with the spirit of the house and a much needed makeover that pushed the brand into the future, others felt the overhaul was unnecessary, overly hyped and even underwhelming. Wide brim hats and seventies style suiting aren’t for everyone, but no matter how you felt about the Saint Laurent Paris ensembles themselves, you knew you were going to be seeing a lot of them. Like the McQueen visors and Prada stripes that came before them, those SLP hats were destined for editorials; fashion editors can’t resist a look with instant visual impact and Slimane’s designs are always distinctive.

Though the chapeaus are shaping up to be one of the most photographed editorial pieces of the moment, few stylists have strayed from the vision Slimane presented on the runway. Every so often though, the mood of the image goes beyond simply rehashing the nonchalant cool vibe of Slimane’s Le Smoking influenced style and pushes into expressive territory. Take a look at the way Lori Goldstein adds a touch of 60s glamour in the Vogue Italia shots of Fei Fei Sun, putting a more structured version of the SLP headpiece to good use but making it right for a completely different kind of mood.

British Vogue photography by Angelo Pennetta, styling by Francesca Burns

Marikka Juhler & Kirsi Pyrhonen in Harper’s Bazaar UK photography by Tom Allen, styling by Cathy Kasterine

Jessica Stam in Vogue Japan by Victor Demarchelier (Paris: Management + Artists, New York: Management + Artists), styling by Sabino Pantone

Fei Fei Sun in Vogue Italia, photography by Steven Meisel, styled by Lori Goldstein

Gwen Stefani in American Vogue photography by Annie Leibovitz, styled by Tonne Goodman

Julia Nobis in Numero, photography by Anthony Maule, styling by Samuel Francois

Harmony Boucher in Marie Claire, photography by Danilo Giuliani, styled by Enrique Campos

Dree Hemingway in Vogue China photography by Max Vadukul, styled by Nicoletta Santoro

Anja Rubik in Elle UK photography by Jan Welters, styled by Anne-Marie Curtis

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Pop Sensations

January 2nd, 2013 |Posted by Janelle

Girl power is front and center in Sharif Hamza‘s (Cadence New York)’s latest story for Vogue Japan with a slew of it-models picking up guitars and playing the hits in this colorful, lighthearted story. Kel Markey, Sung Hee Kim, Ava Smith, Stina Rapp Wastenson, Tilda Lindstam, Natalia Oberhanss, Esther Heesch and Giedre Kiaulenaite star as the ultimate girl group, taking on a variety of looks from 70s glam rock, 80s hard rock excesss, to our personal favorite – all out bubblegum pink-tinted pop. Giovanna Battaglia eclectic styling and Duffy‘s hair artistry are on full display along with Niki Mnray‘s incredible makeup skills.

Vogue Japan – Girls In The Band from Cadence on Vimeo | Images Courtesy Cadance NY

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Double Vision: Celine

November 28th, 2012 |Posted by Janelle

If there is one designer who knows how to get women (and men) excited it is Phoebe Philo and her continued success at Celine is a testament to her ability to tap into the pulse of what women want. For F/W Philo went in a graphic direction, with primary shades, bold color blocking and a mixes of texture, from matte leather to plush fur. One of the most editorially beloved pieces from the Celine collection was the Geometric Intarsia Sweater, a playful clash of mink and leather that succinctly merged the essence of the entire collection into a single item. If another designer were to throw together that many things on one top it might seem overwrought, or ridiculous but Phoebe Philo keeps the look minimal.

Most stylists didn’t stray too far from that ideal, pairing the sweaters with either the runway approved striped trousers, or an equally understated crisp white skirt. Most of the time what stands out are the accessories and add ons, be they gleaming silver cuffs, avant garde headgear or the label’s coveted Trapeze Bag. Take a look at the way in which several different teams interpreted the Celine look and subsequently the sleek mood of the season.

On the Runway – LOOK 10  | Image Courtesy of Celine

The Editorial Interpretation :

Kasia Struss by Steven Pan (Paris: Management + Artists, New York: Management + Artists) for Vogue Japan, stylist Vanessa Traina (Paris: Management + Artists, New York: Management + Artists)

 

Kasia Struss by Knoepfel & Indlekofer for WSJ, styled by David Vandewal

Kati Nescher by Josh Olins for Vogue China, styling Nicoletta Santoro

Karlie Kloss by Raymond Meier for American Vogue, styled by Elissa Santisi

Zuzanna Bijoch and Stella Tennant by Paolo Roversi for W Magazine, styled by Giovanna Battaglia

Olga Sherer by Marcin Tyszka for Elle France

Milagros Schmoll by Alexander Neumann for Harper’s Bazaar Turkey, styled by Sara Francia

Jenna Earle by Takahiro Ogawa in Amica, styled by Claudia Cerruti

Mina Cvetkovic by Henrique Gendre for Grazia, styled by Marine Chaumien

Diana by Anton Jhonsen for Clara Magazine, styled by Lilian Ng

Kirsi Pyrhonen by Mel Bles for Twin Magazine, styled by Celestine Cooney

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Posted in: General news

Double Vision : Dior Couture

October 18th, 2012 |Posted by Janelle

Fashion shows are well and good, but the true test of a collection’s impact is often played out in the editorial pages. When you have multiple editors reaching for the same pieces over and over again you know a designer has hit a nerve. Even when the styling itself isn’t that noticeably different between images, there are always key changes in presentation that separate fashion stories; whether it is the model choice, the manner in which the photographer chose to present the garment, or even something as simple as color vs. black and white, each team puts its own special stamp on things. Take a look at the way in which different magazines have interpreted two of the most popular pieces within the collection and let us know who you think pulled it off best.

Look No. 48  

Black fitted cashmere top with a black duchess satin skirt embroidered with electric blue flowers.

Saskia de Brauw by Daniel Jackson for Vogue Germany, stylist Christiane Arp

Aymeline Valade by Patrick Demarchelier for Vogue Japan, stylist Melanie Ward

Saskia de Brauw by Ruth Hogben for Another Magazine, stylist Katie Shillingford

Karlie Kloss by Eric Guillemain for Sunday Times Style Magazine, stylist Lucy Ewing

Hanaa Ben Abdesslem by Michelle Ferrara for Harper’s Bazaar Arabia, stylist Elaine Lloyd Jones | Suki Waterhouse by Marc Hom for Tatler, stylist Deep Kailey

Stef Van Der Laan by Luca Guadagnino for CR Fashion Book, stylist Carine Roitfeld

 

NiNi in Vogue China / Thana Kuhnen by Marcelo Krasilcic for L’Officiel

Look No. 8

Blue and pink embroidered cut-off ballgown with black cigarette pants

Keira Knightley by Mario Testino for American Vogue, stylist Grace Coddington

Milla Jovovich by Peter Lindbergh for Vogue Italia | Saskia de Brauw by Ruth Hogben for Another Magazine

Dior couture illustration by Ignasi Monreal for Spanish V Magazine

Aymeline Valade by Patrick Demarchelier for Vogue Japanstylist Melanie Ward

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Dark & Lovely

July 25th, 2012 |Posted by Janelle

With her long black hair and piercing blue eyes, Kinga Rajzak has become the go-to girl for editorials in need of an eerie touch, but just because she’s everyone’s favorite ultra-cool beauty doesn’t mean she can’t deliver classic elegance when called for. Jem Mitchell‘s dynamic beauty shots for Vogue Japan are dark and brooding, but they’re also a sophisticated showcase for the timeless appeal of a berry lip, or smoky eye created by Petros Petrohilos. Chic styling by Jamie Surman, enhances the story, with gothic pieces from Ann Demeulemeester and lacy Dolce & Gabbana setting the sartoriali mood. Hair genius Neil Moodie ads the final bit of polish, crafting elegantly undone styles for Kinga, that mesh with the woodsy setting and folkloric feel.

Images Courtesy of Jed Root

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Edit of the Week : A Simple Plan

June 1st, 2012 |Posted by Janelle

A good story doesn’t need a lot of bells and whistles, sometimes the very best rely on tenants of simplicity. Willy Vanderperre (Paris: Management + Artists, New York: Management + Artists) creates an elegant exploration of denim in the latest Vogue Japan with a little help from master stylist George Cortina. Taking one of the most commonplace (and often boring) materials and making editorially relevant is no small feat, but Cortina pulls it off masterfully. On the backs of Marte Mei van Haaster, Katryn Kruger & Victor Nylander the pieces come alive and pared down hair and makeup by Anthony Turner and Lucia Pica add the final bit of polish to a story that feels effortless.

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The Look of Hans Feurer

May 24th, 2012 |Posted by Janelle

As fashion’s foremost purveyor of nomad chic, Hans Feurer‘s images are unmistakable. Though his body of work is diverse, the pictures that stand out most tend to feature a series of Feurer signatures; layered undone styling, exotic locations and bold tribal makeup. Look at his latest stories for Vogue Paris and Vogue Japan respectively and you’ll see all the trademarks of his aesthetic. VP’s Karmen Pedaru story goes for a harder edge, while his images of Constance Jablonski are all about highlighting her refined beauty, but both stories hinge on variations of the same idea. Take a glimpse back at Feurer’s work over the years and see how he developed the style he’s now known for.

2012 – Karmen Pedaru for Vogue Paris

2012 – Constance Jablonski for Vogue Japan

2011 – Jourdan Dunn for Vogue Paris

2011 – Natasha Poly for Vogue Paris

2010 – Tony Ward for GQ Style Germany

2008 – Erin Heatherton for Muse Magazine

2008 – Scott Barnhill

2007 Jessica Miller for Self Service no. 27

2001 – Erin Wasson for Vogue Paris

1991 – Beverly Peele for Elle France

1983 - American Vogue

1983 – Kenzo

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