Food For Thought

May 8th, 2015 |Posted by Irene Ojo-Felix

Steven Meisel‘s latest offering for Vogue Italia has newcomer Kayla Scott looking enticingly delectable in Spring’s latest wares. There’s a full course offering in the dilapidated, motel setting and has unique, edgy newcomers like Cierra Skye, Damaris Goddrie, Willow Hand, Tamy Glauser, and Josh Upshaw. Meisel is always about new talent and with the superb styling of Karl Templer, the newest crop is sure to be on everyone’s radar now. With a cool casting and contemplative mood, this stands as a refreshing editorial on newsstands. For a special behind the scenes video, check out Vogue.it.

Photographer Steven Meisel (Art + Commerce) | Stylist Karl Templer (Streeters London) | Set designer Mary Howard | Hair Guido Palau (Art + Commerce) | Makeup Pat McGrath (Streeters London) | Manicurist Jin Soon Choi (Jed Root) | Models Kayla Scott
Cierra Skye, Damaris Goddrie, Eilika Meckbach, Josh Upshaw, Molly Bair, Nyima Ward,Tamy Glauser, and Willow Hand

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Josh and Julia

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Cierra and Tami

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Molly and Nyima

Posted in: General news

Asymmetries and Ambiguities

April 29th, 2015 |Posted by steven.yatsko

Steven Meisel delivered his visual quintessence for Prada’s pre-fall 2015 campaign. Appearing determined with penetrating glares, the duos Maartje Verhoef, Niels Trispel, Willow Hand, Artur Chruszcz, Aya Jones, Johannes Spaas, Natalie Westling, Finnlay Davis, Julia Nobis, & Tim Schuhmacher are a mixture of the freshest new faces and some Prada favorites. If Julia feels familiar it’s because she can add this to her Meisel-résumé, marking her second one for the brand along with her four covers of Vogue Italia. The pre-fall looks work tartan prints and mild pomp against the understated, and the introspective group executes that identity well, preparing us for the colder days to come. In Prada’s own words, the images play with “asymmetries and ambiguities” and elicit “elegance, poise and dare”. The campaign has the definitive feel of Meisel’s classic, cast-centric work and Miuccia’s visionary originality.

Photographer: Steven Meisel (Art + Commerce) Designer: Miuccia Prada

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Finnlay DavisJulia Nobis / Artur ChruszczAya Jones

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Natalie WestlingNiels Trispel /  Johannes SpaasJulia Nobis

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Natalie Westling, Tim Schuhmacher / Louis BauvirMaartje Verhoef

 

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Niels TrispelWillow Hand / Johannes SpaasMaartje Verhoef

 

Posted in: General news

Fine China

April 23rd, 2015 |Posted by Irene Ojo-Felix

China has been haunted by literary tropes that have shown but a fraction of the rich, dynastic culture it has. For this summer’s Metropolitan Museum of Art exhibition, “China: Through the Looking Glass”, The Costume Institute in collaboration with the Met’s Department of Asian Art, will examine the influence of the Chinese aesthetics on Western fashion. For the latest issue of American Vogue, Steven Meisel and Grace Coddington have taken this examination one step further highlighting elegant, vintage couture creations on the lithe form of Fei Fei Sun. From the blossoming branches of a new season to come to the alluring, sensual mystery of a woman not to be trifled with, this year’s exhibit shows the range of narratives that surrounds the enigmatic country of the Far East.

Pick up the latest issue of Vogue on newsstands this week.

Photographer- Steven Meisel (Art + Commerce), Stylist- Grace Coddington, Model- Fei Fei Sun, Make-Up-Pat McGrath (Streeters London), Hair- Guido Palau (Art + Commerce)

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Vogue, May 2015 (10)

Posted in: General news

Prada’s Haunting Postscript

March 9th, 2015 |Posted by steven.yatsko

Prada released three hauntingly beautiful backstage videos as a postscript to their Spring/Summer 2015 campaign that was photographed by Steven Meisel. As Gemma Ward, Julia Nobis and Ine Neefs recede into speckled shadows or are enveloped by a spectral, ultraviolet glow their floaty movements are eerily entrancing. The trio of models, each with their own video, convey only whispers of emotions to great effect. Passing close-ups of the stitchings and patterns concentrate on the garments’ details. The pithy, dream-like videos add even more expression to the still campaign. An adagio piano score and doleful expressions conjecture feelings of melancholy and establish the wonderfully seductive hints of unconventionality that is Miuccia’s domain.

Posted in: General news

Industrious

February 3rd, 2015 |Posted by Janelle

Steven Meisel plays with various styles for his Vogue Italia covers, but many of the best have a cinematic quality that makes them appear like stills from a motion picture. Meisel’s photography is energetic, richly detailed and often seems ready to start moving the moment some unseen director yells “Action!” The February cover of VI is a prime example of this a Dolce & Gabbana clad Lexi Boling may be the first thing to grab your attention, but each detail adds to the story. The sewing machines in the background, Mary Howard‘s comprehensive set design and even the blur of men moving all around Lexi. It all makes for a stunning tribute to fashion workers anchored by Marie-Amélie Sauvé styling, Pat McGrath doing makeup and Jimmy Paul handling hair.

View more from the February issue on Vogue.it

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Posted in: General news

Coach’s Chameleons

January 28th, 2015 |Posted by Janelle

Few fashion brands have the name recognition of Coach, the global powerhouse has long represented attainable chic and American style, for better or worse. In recent years Coach has attempted to reinvent itself upping the luxury factor and revamping its ready-to-wear under the direction of the talented, Stuart Vevers. For the 2nd collection under Vevers’ leadership Steven Meisel captures the fresh faced cast in pastel & black and white for a series of images that merge ideas about youthful insouciance and Americana. Looking like the ultimate gang of cool kids, Molly Bair, Binx Walton, Julia Bergshoeff, Lexi Boling, Valery Kaufman, Dylan Xue, Grace Hartzel and Helge Vonderau look right at home chilling out in Ditmas Park.

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Julia Bergshoeff

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Helge Vonderau

Posted in: General news

Meisel’s Masterclass

January 28th, 2015 |Posted by Janelle

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Meisel’s self portrait from Loewe‘s latest campaign

As a creator who has always let his work speak for itself, Steven Meisel rarely gives interviews or does press. A quiet, yet powerful presence within the industry he has come to represent the gold standard of photography; whenever he shoots a campaign or cover it’s big news, his work is often described as making the supermodels and in spite of his shy, introspective demeanor he continues to be one of fashion’s most fascinating characters. Perhaps that is why Tim Blanks‘s appealingly in-depth interview with Meisel for WSJ feels so essential. Tackling topics ranging from Meisel’s career retrospective, Role Model at Phillips de Pury, to his thoughts on controversial shoots for Vogue Italia, Blanks cuts a wide swath through years of industry history. As always Blanks’ insightful questions and wry writing style offer a new perspective on the familiar, showing us the personal side of a photographer who communicates his deepest feelings through his images rather than his social media account.

Head on over to WSJ.com to take a look at this week’s must read piece and enjoy a few choice Meisel quotes below.

On old pictures :  “Emotionally, it’s very difficult for me to look at old work. That’s why it was so hard to do the Phillips thing. I either look at what I could have done better, or I start crying. I’m ridiculously sensitive, that’s just who I am, so it’s really tough for me to look at old pictures.”

On changes within the modeling & fashion industries: “I think the business has changed so much. It’s more like how many likes you get on Instagram, which I do not do. I’m not into it. I don’t know what makes a star anymore. I’m just doing what I do. So is there an expectation? Not from me. And I hope not so much from the model, because I don’t want to disappoint anybody. My goal is just to do what I need to do on that day.”

On aging: I don’t care about age. Society is extremely ageist, obviously, and it’s just nonsense. To think of a woman’s life as only interesting and important until 25 is stupid and also so hurtful to women. The business creates it and then lets you hate yourself for it. Age is beautiful; life is that. You just begin to be a woman past the age of 30. You’re just learning life and having experiences.

Posted in: General news

Prada Principles

January 5th, 2015 |Posted by Janelle

From the moment Gemma Ward stepped out onto Prada‘s S/S15 runway it seemed certain that she would front the corresponding spring campaign for the Milanese megabrand. Miuccia Prada never does things by halves, so when it came time for campaign season fashion followers eagerly awaited the final product and the streamlined ads by Steven Meisel, styled by Olivier Rizzo, do not disappoint. Gemma is front and center in a stark black and white shot, contrasted with a colorful image of the season’s must have accessories. Ine Neefs features in the campaign’s equally beautiful second shot sporting a sleek dress with contrast stitching and a perfectly coordinated bowler bag. Rounding out the cast of elegant blondes is Julia Nobis, a Prada fixture and perennial Meisel favorite who lends an air of austerity to her portraits.

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Gemma Ward

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Julia Nobis

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Ine Neefs

Posted in: General news

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