A New Hope

April 1st, 2015 |Posted by steven.yatsko

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As Man About Town, the bi-annual men’s fashion and lifestyle publication, releases its Spring/Summer 2015 issue tomorrow entitled A NEW HOPE, one gets the feeling this new generation is predestined to set the stage for a social renaissance. On the multiple covers shot by Alasdair McLellan a prepossessing Bjorn stands semi-gawk semi-sophisticate with styling by Olivier Rizzo that is democratic in its androgyny. For the issue, the exclusive previews of AW 15 Gucci, J.W. Anderson, Raf Simons, and Prada match MAT’s pitch perfect breed of meta-decadal fingerprinting.

We spoke to Ben Reardon, the editor-in-chief of Man About Town, recently to get personal insight and some cultural forecasting. After a stint at British GQ Style and i-D before that, he’s found familiar terra firma at Man –the independent magazine world being a language more native to him.  Ben understands that the the editor’s compass is always shifting following cultural zeitgeists. 

Photos courtesy of Man About Town

S: We met while you were at British GQ Style, and before then it was I-D. Now you’re the editor-in-chief of Man About Town. What attracted you there?

B: The idea of a return to independent publishing and the freedom that entails was really appealing. I learnt so much at i-D, it wasn’t just a job, and it was more like family at a pivotal time in my life. I still think of Terry and Tricia Jones, the founders of i-D, as my second parents. After seven years it was time for a new challenge and I had always wanted to experience work within the incredible world of Condé Nast. The thought of bridging the gap between the mainstream and counter-culture always appeals to me. I was very proud of the work we achieved there: commissioning Inez and Vinoodh to shoot James Franco as Adam Ant, Juergen Teller to go to Noma, the best restaurant in the world, Alasdair McLellan to shoot One Direction’s first ever editorial, Harmony Korine to shoot his first ever fashion story, pairing Gus Van Sant with the genius stylist Panos Yiapanis and Terry Richardson shooting the guys from Game of Thrones, Breaking Bad and Sons of Anarchy to celebrate a golden age of TV. My final cover was Pharrell just on the stratospheric upturn of his career, wearing Jake and Dinos Chapman for Kim Jones at Louis Vuitton with cover graphics by Fergadelic–the designer who I currently work with at Man About Town. These were all big moments and felt genuinely exciting to broker under the GQ banner.

But I have an independent aesthetic at heart and a deep-rooted love of the young and the new, all of which can be fully realised at Man About Town. The only constraints here are what I can make happen. From issue 1, it was about turning a good, functioning magazine into something relevant and vital. Brooklyn Beckham’s first ever, editorial story was a punt I wanted to take for my first cover. I loved the idea of the words ‘Man’ and ‘Boy’ written closely together on the cover, extending the remit of how menswear was delivered editorially. The punt paid off–those images went global, featured across the global news media, on talk shows and breakfast TV. They set a news agenda for a week, something you can’t often do at a fashion magazine. It was just a boy in a school uniform, but it delivered a very explicit fashion message that was British, simple, elegant and in tune with its times. Sometimes the pressure is daunting, but I purposefully wanted to open a door into a new vocabulary in menswear.

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S: Can you describe to me any cultural drifts, things more substantial than a trend, that may be informing some of what you put into the magazine in terms of content and talent?

B: I attend the fashion shows each season in London, Florence, Milan then finishing in Paris. These are when buyers, editors, stylists and journalists see the clothes and concepts we will be working with the following season, which we then have to digest, process and translate to the reader. The way that I work is very instinctive. I rely on my cultural awareness and set a theme accordingly. The team then tries to understand my random thought process and hopefully incorporates fashion into something wider and more meaningful than a selection of garments. A lot of care and thought goes into everything from the graphics to the titles, the teams paired and the journalism. I believe the written word, paired with a great photograph, inspired styling and a brilliant title graphic can be explosive. I believe in printed matter and always will. It’s still the best way of organizing thought when executed correctly.

S: Do you have any process for cultivating your intuitions in this scope – or gathering inspiration?

B: When I was growing up the Internet wasn’t around. It was a time before everything was readily available. So you had to rely on libraries to read books, charity shops for clothes and markets for records and fanzines. The first fashion magazine that I actually bought was Kurt Cobain on the cover of The Face. I was going on holiday with my mum and dad and it was in the airport. I was 14, at the awkward age when you hate everything. I was in a hot country and stayed in the shadows, reading that magazine from cover to cover time and time again. Seeing fashion photography for the first time blew my mind. You pick at the seams of culture now and things fall apart. The only thing we have left in an age of shared information and aesthetic overload is the intimate specifics of someone’s taste. I try to hang a lot of those thoughts together in magazines because that feels like their magic to me.

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S: Reading and looking at your work, I get a feeling that your intentions are to produce work that feels more regional and colloquial. That there’s value in that context. Have you ever thought about this?   

B: The previous issue of MAT was specifically themed around the idea Is Britain Still Great? It was put together at a shifting, scary, weird time politically in Britain and we wanted to address it. We spent the summer travelling around the UK, finding beauty and interest in small local stories and tackling politics along the way. There was a genuine feeling back in the office when we assembled the stories that we’d achieved something more thoughtful than just another magazine about menswear. To care and to give something depth resonates more, hopefully. We chose Jack O’Connell as the cover star as for me he represents a particular British localism, albeit one that is translating to a world stage. He’s the handsome wag who lives down the street that just happens to be super-talented. He’s won a Bafta and bagged a Prada campaign whilst the magazine is still on the shelves. Again, we felt like he said something more than just being a nice face in nice clothes.

S: Where did you grow up and what were you interested in as a boy? 

B: I grew up in Newport, South Wales. When I was growing up everyone was in a band. NME labelled Newport the new Seattle. Donna from Elastica went to my school. Everyone drank at the local club called, The Legendary TJs, where Kurt Cobain proposed to Courtney Love and the Manic Street Preachers hung out. TJ’s was pivotal to me in every way. Dressing up and getting the bus into town was an event there. My sister loved The Smiths and Morrissey, so Morrissey has always been a constant throughout my life. We listened to Hatful of Hollow in my dad’s car, cut out posters from magazines to paper her walls with and I wore her boy-sucking-a-lollipop Smiths tee for my non-uniform day in Junior School. When I was aged 14, Morrissey played support to David Bowie in Cardiff, I was so excited I puked all over myself. So, Morrissey. It has always been Morrissey. And it will always be Morrissey. Who else is there?

S: Have you ever had any odd jobs?

B: The jobs I did like stacking shelves and working in an off-license were to supplement me doing work placement at magazines whilst studying at Art College. I met Rachel Newsome, who was then Editor at Dazed and Confused, and worked there for a year, editing the Eye Spy pages at the front of the book, previously edited by Nicola Formichetti. Katy England and Alister Mackie would visit the office and it would be a sensation seeing in person people who I had studied the work of for so long. A job at i-D was advertised in the Guardian. I applied, was interviewed by Terry Jones, got the job and later became editor.

S: Are there any personal obsessions that you inject into your work? I know you’re wild about at least a few things.

B: Morrissey and David Lynch are the two constants. They’re there in pretty much everything I do, explicitly or implicitly. They informed my taste at a crucial age. You can never run away from that.

S: I think you’re really great at pairing talent, sometimes finding obscure fixings. What’s your objective when building the team for a project?

B: It has to be more than just a model, a photograph and some clothes. It goes back to people caring. I value knowledge and intuition. The people I collaborate with are experts in their fields. You can’t force someone to take a picture otherwise it becomes so bland and catalogue. I think when worlds collide and things clash, then you get brilliant results. The high and the low is always a tense, interesting mix.

S: Who would be your dream team?

B: I’m lucky to say that I only work with people I love and admire. Having said that, I would love to meet and work with Bruce Weber one day. The world he creates with his pictures is one I would love to inhabit.

S: Are there any models you would use over and over again?

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B: I love Lara Stone. Her face and attitude evokes European cinema and she always creates an interesting character. She can turn from submissive to aggressive, from sex to restrained in the curl of a lip or furrow of her brow. And she is, when all’s said and done, a breathtaking beauty.

S: Especially for this previous issue of Man About Town, you worked closely with Alasdair McLellan. What are your favorite elements of his work in-and-out of the fashion medium?

B: It’s very personal with Alasdair, we trust each other. It’s a pleasure to work with him. It’s not just taking a fashion image; it’s about finding talent, an oddness, a narrative and a story. We share very similar references and Alasdair knows pop culture like nobody I have ever met. He has an encyclopedic knowledge of obscure facts and figures related to the charts, 60s kitchen sink dramas, Morrissey lyrics, scenes in Star Wars and he uses this to create characters in a world that is just his. And he makes it all seem so effortless. His pictures look like beautiful stills from the most amazing film you have never seen. It’s always very British, sometimes dour and with a touch of sadness, but always with great elegance and sophistication. His expert hand is like no other and I am beyond proud to call him my friend.

S: Has the British aesthetic resurged in prevalence?

B: There’s a new wave of super exciting image makers coming through in London, as an editor, it’s an exciting time with a host of new photographers and stylists to collaborate with. They all share some esoteric similarities, making work that is very personal, arty, weird, wrong, sexual, staged, sincere and very British. I guess it’s the first time since Alasdair that we’re watching a new wave coming through which is always inspiring to see.

S: How has the landscape of the fashion industry, men’s in particular, changed over the last decade?

B: There’s a lot more of it and it’s gotten much busier, with London Collections Men’s added to the schedule and now New York Men’s fashion week being spoken of. The process of editing so much visual information down to a coherent thought has become even more of the most beautiful headache.

S: What’s your favorite film?

B: Star Wars. Always.

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All 4 covers, Bjorn by Alasdair McLellan (Art Partner) /  Styling by Olivier Rizzo

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Shane and Hamish Frew by Alasdair McLellan (Art Partner) /  Styling by Olivier Rizzo / Hair by Matt Mulhall (Streeters London) / Makeup by Ninni Nummela (Streeters London)

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Photography by Mike O’Meally

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Michael by Alasdair McLellan (Art Partner) / Hair by Malcolm Edwards (Art Partner) / Makeup by Lynsey Alexander (Streeters London)

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Harry by Letty Schmiterlow / Styling by Danny Reed

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Finnlay Davis by Jamie Hawkesworth / Styling by Jonathan Anderson / Hair and grooming by Gary Gill

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Hugo, Jules and Marko at Rebel by Gosha Rubchinskiy / Styling by Lotta Volkova Adam (New York: ArtList NY, Paris: ArtList Paris) / Hair and grooming by Gary Gill

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Jeremie Renier by Willy Vanderperre (Art + Commerce) / Hair by Anthony Turner (Art Partner) /  Grooming by Lynsey Alexander (Streeters London)

Posted in: General news

Fashion Generation

July 22nd, 2013 |Posted by models.com

Karlie Kloss is joined by electronic music duo Daft Punk in a playful photo shoot for August’s American Vogue. In “All-Ages Show”, Tabitha Simmons (Streeters New York) styles Kloss for a night out on the town in trendy looks for every age, whether you’re 20-something or 60-something. The “Get Lucky” musical duo, looking robotically dapper, stand alongside Kloss, where Kloss’s signature elegance shines through as per usual. The pairing of the young model and electronic duo may seem odd to some, but it most definitely works, delivering an editorial of fabulous fall fashions for every generation.

Photographer: Craig McDean | Hair: Malcolm Edwards | Makeup: Mark Carrasquillo

Text by Victoria Perillo

VIEW THE FULL STORY ON VOGUE.COM

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Claire Danes covers the August issue of American Vogue, on stands now.

Posted in: General news

Seeing Spots

May 30th, 2013 |Posted by Janelle

When Haider Ackermann filled his S/S13 runway with transparent creations emblazoned with black and white dots, it seemed like an unusual move. Polka dots are a fashion standard dating back years, but the diminutive patterns are more often associated with the prim styles of the 1950s than with the kinds of cutting-edge wares favored on Paris’ runways. The designer so known for his innovative use of lush, saturated color was showing another side, taking one of the most uncool of motifs and making it feel new.

In keeping with the current craze for all things graphic, stylists have embraced the versatility of these simple circles, working Ackermann’s creations into a variety of editorials. On occasion the interpretations don’t veer too far from the runway approach (fashion abides by the ‘if it ain’t broke don’t fix it’ mantra whenever it can) but the excitement comes when the spots are complimented by clashing patterns to create a dynamic visual treat. Whether it is layering in another of Ackermann’s prints from S/S or adding a bold kimono for interest, the real fun lies in the mix which offers stylists an opportunity to show their creativity.

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W Magazine | Photographer: Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott | Fashion Editor/ Stylist:Edward Enninful | Hair: Malcolm Edwards | Makeup: Lucia Pieroni | Set Designer: Poppy Bartlett | Manicurist: Anatole Rainey | Model: Ondria Hardin

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Vogue China | Photographer: Inez van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin | Fashion Editor/ Stylist: Nicoletta Santoro (New York: Management + Artists, Paris: Management + Artists) | Hair: James Pecis | Makeup: Tom Pecheux | Manucurist: Gina Viviano | Casting: Piergiorgio Del Moro | Model: Arizona Muse

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032C Photographer: Jamie Morgan | Styling:Jodie Barnes | Hair: Tomo Jidai | Make-up:Laura Dominique | Model: Arizona Muse

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Elle France | Photogrpaher: Bjarne Jonasson | Stylist: Michele Beaurenaut | Model: Xiao Wen Ju

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Vogue Thailand | Photographer: David Bellemere | Stylist: Anna Schiffel | Model: Anna de Rijk

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Numero | Photographer: Greg Harris | Stylist: Sheila Single | Model: Stef Van Der Laan

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Elle Italia | Photographer: Alexei Hay | Casting: Paul Hunt at JN Casting | Model: Pau Bertolini

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Vogue China | Photographer: Sharif Hamza (Cadence New York) | Fashion Editor/ Stylist: Tiina Laakkonen | Hair: Esther Langham | Makeup: Francelle Daly | Model: Ji Hye Park

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Marie Claire Magazine | Photographer: Danilo Gallinari | Fashion Editor: Enrique Campos | Hair: Javier Palacio | Makeup: Tatyana Makarova| Manicure: Lucia Cheptene | Model: Harmony Boucher

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W Magazine | Photographer: Tim Walker | Fashion Editor/ Stylist: Jacob K | Hair: Julien d’Ys | Makeup: Stephane Marais | Set Designer: Rhea Thierstein | Model: Tilda Swinton

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10 Magazine |  Photographer: Robert Schoerner | Fashion Editor/Stylist: Sophia Neophitou | Model: Kristen McMenamy

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Vogue Russia | Photographer: Tom Craig | Fashion Editor/ Stylist: Olga Dunina | Model:Arizona Muse

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i-D Magazine | Photographer: Mari Sarai | Fashion Editor/ Stylist: Erika Kurihara | Hair: Tomo Jidai | Makeup: Janeen Witherspoon | Casting: Shelley Durkan | Model: Soo Joo

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Vogue Turkey | Photographer: Cuneyt Akeroglu | Fashion Editor/ Stylist: Semra Russell| Hair: Colin Gold | Model: Stina Rapp Wastenson

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British Vogue | Photographer: Josh Olins| Fashion Editor/ Stylist: Clare Richardson | Hair: Shon | Makeup: Sally Branka | Set Designer: Kadu Lennox | Models: Meghan Collison and Juliana Schurig

Posted in: General news

Spotlight On: Malcolm Edwards

April 23rd, 2013 |Posted by Janelle

Hair can be one of the most transformative aspects of fashion editorials, taking models into otherworldly territory and changing how we view their beauty. As anyone who appreciates hair will tell you, one of the most exciting talents around is Malcolm Edwards, whose cutting-edge styles are works of art. From creating colorful pasty inspired do’s in W Magazine, to giving Oscar winner, Jennifer Lawrence a bit of flamingo finery, Edwards never fails to infuse a hint of magic in his imagery.

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Ph. Patrick Demarchelier | Fashion Editor – Edward Enninful | For more see Wmagazine.com

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Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott
 (Photographer) | Katie Grand (Fashion Editor/Stylist) | Malcolm Edwards (Hair Stylist) | Lucia Pieroni (Makeup Artist) | Jacki Castelli (Set Designer) | Lorraine Griffin (Manicurist) – see all the covers in the database.

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Tim Walker – Photographer | Jacob K – Fashion Editor/Stylist | Malcolm Edwards – Hair Stylist | Samantha Bryant – Makeup Artist | Andy Hillman – Set Designer

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Kerry Hallihan – Photographer | Alastair McKimm – Fashion Editor/Stylist | Malcolm Edwards – Hair Stylist | Ozzy Salvatierra – Makeup Artist | See the full story in the database 

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Ph.Kerry Hallihan | Grace Cobb (Fashion Editor/Stylist) | Malcolm Edwards (Hair Stylist) | Laura Dominique (Makeup Artist) | See the story in the database 

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Ph. Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott |  Edward Enninful – Fashion Editor/Stylist | Malcolm Edwards – Hair Stylist  | Lucia Pieroni – Makeup Artist | Poppy Bartlett – Set Designer | Anatole Rainey – Manicurist

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Tim Walker (Photographer) | Jacob K (Fashion Editor/Stylist) | Malcolm Edwards (Hair Stylist) | Samantha Bryant (Makeup Artist) | Shona Heath (Set Designer) | See the full story on W Magazine.com

Posted in: General news

London Swings

November 20th, 2009 |Posted by Janelle

Jourdan Dunn, goes mod for i-D in an editorial by Kerry Hallihan. With a little help, from Edward Enninfuls inspired style choices and a voluminous hairstyle courtesy of Malcolm Edwards‘ the British beauty takes on an entirely new look. Halluan’s pictures call to mind classic 1960s Vogue and Jourdan’s expressive poses give the shoot life.

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Jourdan Dunn by Kerry HallihaOther Linkn | Scan by Northern Star at tFS

Posted in: General news