Seeing Stars

April 21st, 2015 |Posted by steven.yatsko

It may be a mere coincidence but hopefully it’s something more positive- 4 eye-catching covers with some of our favorite black models of today. A shift is indeed rising: Joan Smalls on the cover of Lucky Magazine (normally reserved for celebrities), Binx Walton fronting Vogue Espana, Aya Jones gracing Numéro and Liya Kebede returning once again for a Vogue Paris cover (and the first black model on the cover since 2010’s issue with then new face, Rose Cordero). At any rate, we feel it’s a fantastic step in the right direction. With the return of models commandeering the covers of the major fashion glossies in the past year, we really hope that these four covers are but the beginning of this trend of including beauties of all colors.

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Liya Kebede by Inez van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin for Vogue Paris

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Joan Smalls by Miguel Reveriego (Camilla Lowther Management) for Lucky Magazine

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Binx Walton by Nico (New York: ArtList NY, Berlin: Shotview Photographers Management, Paris: ArtList Paris) for Vogue Espana

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Aya Jones by Daniel Sannwald (Management + Artists) for Numero

Posted in: General news

Off Kilter

April 14th, 2015 |Posted by steven.yatsko

METAL Magazine no. 33 resides at a frequency somewhere between installation art and the fashion image, deliberately acting off-kilter in its latest issue. Metal’s Spring/Summer issue has still-lifes dueling with oft midway moments that serve up a slate of fresh talent and makers. The cover story features a banged Stina Rapp Wastenson photographed by Mari Sarai. Check out the exclusive preview before the issue is out!

Images courtesy of Metal Magazine

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Stina Rapp Wastenson by Mari Sarai (Society MGMT), Styling by Raquel Garcia, Hair by Thanos Samaras, Makeup by Cedric Jolivet (See Management)
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Anine Van Velzen by Arnaud Lajeunie, Styling by Victoria Sekrier, Hair by Gilles Degivry (Paris: ArtList Paris, New York: ArtList NY), Makeup by Hugo Villard (Atomo Management)
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William by Greta Ilieva, Styling by Victoria Sekrier, Hair by Louis Ghewy, Makeup by Joanna Banach
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Fredrika Larsson by Poncho Paradela, Styling by Georgina Santiago, Hair and Makeup by Manuela Panne
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Carl by Amanda Camenisch, Styling Lorenzo Posocco, Hair by Rachel Bredy, Make up Daniela Koller
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Lucie Grace by Ilaria Orsini, Styling Nobuko Tannawa, Hair by Yumi Nakada-Dingle, Makeup by Nobuko Maekawa
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Reba Maybury by CG Watkins, Styling Santi Rodriguez, Grooming by Hiroshi Matsushita

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Willis, Ronnie and Simon by Alexandra LeeseStyling Stevie Westgarth (New York: D + V Management, London: D + V Management ), Hair by Roku Roppongi, Makeup by Gina Blondell

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Lena Hardt by Richard Jensen, Styling by Benjamin Brouillet, Hair by Olivier Henry, Makeup byKarin Westerlund
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Alyosha Kovalyova by Atlanta Rascher, Styling by Nina Walbecq, Hair by Louis Ghewy, Makeup by Danielle Kahlani
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Dane by Ben Lamberty (See Management), Styling Romina Herrera Malatesta (See Management), Hair by Riad Azar
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Alastair George by Nicole Maria Winkler, Styling by Santi Rodriguez, Hair by Yumi Nakada-Dingle, Makeup Angela Davis-Deacon
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Lily Turnbull by Baud Postma, Styling by Raquel Garcia, Hair by Yumi Nakada-Dingle, Makeup by Emma Williams

Posted in: General news

News of the Future

April 8th, 2015 |Posted by steven.yatsko

Resistance isn’t always dramatic and still waters run deep in Document Journal‘s latest issue. “Come Here, Look Back, Move Forward” serves as chieftains Nick Vogelson & James Valeri‘s editorial reaction to the new media landscape, from which a wave of artists are distilling distinctive, sober visuals. The two covers celebrate the unwavering Daria Werbowy and Lara Stone. Collier Schorr artfully captures the irrepressible beauty of Daria while Tyrone Lebon lenses a sanguinely casual Lara. Schorr’s mega-spread includes Freja Beha ErichsenJoan Smalls and more. Harley Weir shoots a spectrum of introspective stories with familiar names like Rianne van Rompaey, Chloe Sevigny and Binx Walton. The photographer chose Russia to portray a cast of delicately posed males acting in dissent from the country’s tenets of masculinity. Document also includes “The Smell of Us”, the Larry Clark & Jonathan Anderson collaborative insert book. Check out the preview below, only on models.com! 

Images of courtesy of Document Journal

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Daria Werbowy by Collier Schorr, Fashion director James Valeri (Home Agency), Set designer Peter Klein (Los Angeles: FRANK REPS LA, New York: FRANK REPS NY)


Lara Stone by Tyrone Lebon, Fashion editor Max Pearmain

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Daria Werbowy, Joan Smalls, Katlin Aas,  & Freja Beha Erichsen by Collier Schorr, Fashion director James Valeri (Home Agency), Hair by Bob Recine & Holli Smith (New York: Total Management, Los Angeles: Total Management, Paris: Total Management), Make up by Kanako Takase Set Design by Peter Klein (New York: FRANK REPS NY, Los Angeles: FRANK REPS LA)

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Rianne van Rompaey by Harley Weir, Fashion director James Valeri (Home Agency), Hair by Tina Outen (Streeters London), Make up Nami Yoshida

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Chloe Sevigny, Binx Walton, Olympia Scarry and Raina Hamner by Harley Weir, Fashion editor Sara Moonves (Camilla Lowther Management), Hair by Duffy (Streeters London), Make up by Susie Sobol, Casting by Kegan Webb



Moron, Lovech, Dry, Murk, Axe & Stephan Ladonkin and Nikolas Ladonkin by Harley Weir, Fashion director Lotta Volkova Adam (Paris: ArtList Paris, New York: ArtList NY)

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Frank Lebon, Lara Stone, Moffy Gathorne Hardy, by Tyrone Lebon, Fashion editor Max Pearmain, Hair by Cyndia Harvey (Streeters London), Make up by Isamaya Ffrench (Streeters London) and Kay Montano (London: D + V Management , New York: D + V Management)

 

Casting by Piergiorgio Del Moro (Exposure NY) and Samuel Ellis Scheinman unless stated otherwise.

Posted in: General news

Finding Utopia

April 6th, 2015 |Posted by steven.yatsko

“We may never live in perfect harmony. Utopia isn’t really ever found. But today, by believing in it, we just may be able to make the mundane sublime,” starts the Find Utopia issue of Russh #63. Sublime being a good word to describe the carefree content and rosy palettes. On the cover, mother of three and mega-model Vivien Solari is the image of serenity by Johan Sandberg (Stockholm: LUNDLUND, Paris: ArtList Paris, New York: ArtList NY) appearing perfectly blushed and ruddy by Kathy le Sant.  Stefan Heinrichs captures a wispy-haired Magdalena Jasek encapsulating the spirited attitude of springtime youth. For the lens of Emma Tempest (Jed Root), Helena Severin and Farez Brahmi get intimate as dusk approaches. In The Lost Paradise series James Nelson breathes new life into seventies psychedelia exploring in painted strokes of peachy pastels and violets against textured terrains.

Find your own Utopia April 9th when Russh Magazine #63 will be on stands!

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Vivien Solari by Johan Sandberg (Stockholm: LUNDLUND, Paris: ArtList Paris, New York: ArtList NY) / Styling by Anna Schiffel / Hair by Karin Bigler (Jed Root) / Makeup by Kathy le Sant (Walter Schupfer Management), Casting by Larissa Gunn

Magdalena Jasek and Darius Tralbalza by Stefan Heinrichs / Styling by Verity Parker (Jed Root) / Hair by Philippe Baligan using Aveda / Makeup by Cynthia Baligan using M.A.C / Set design by Stephanie Kevers

Farez Brahmi and Helena Severin by Emma Tempest (Jed Root) / Styling by Dianna Lunt / Makeup by Sandra Cooke using M.A.C / Hair by  Karim Belghiran (Paris: ArtList Paris, New York: ArtList NY)

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Photography by James Nelson / Styling by Billie Iveson / Collages by Kitty Callaghan

 

Posted in: General news

A New Hope

April 1st, 2015 |Posted by steven.yatsko

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As Man About Town, the bi-annual men’s fashion and lifestyle publication, releases its Spring/Summer 2015 issue tomorrow entitled A NEW HOPE, one gets the feeling this new generation is predestined to set the stage for a social renaissance. On the multiple covers shot by Alasdair McLellan a prepossessing Bjorn stands semi-gawk semi-sophisticate with styling by Olivier Rizzo that is democratic in its androgyny. For the issue, the exclusive previews of AW 15 Gucci, J.W. Anderson, Raf Simons, and Prada match MAT’s pitch perfect breed of meta-decadal fingerprinting.

We spoke to Ben Reardon, the editor-in-chief of Man About Town, recently to get personal insight and some cultural forecasting. After a stint at British GQ Style and i-D before that, he’s found familiar terra firma at Man –the independent magazine world being a language more native to him.  Ben understands that the the editor’s compass is always shifting following cultural zeitgeists. 

Photos courtesy of Man About Town

S: We met while you were at British GQ Style, and before then it was I-D. Now you’re the editor-in-chief of Man About Town. What attracted you there?

B: The idea of a return to independent publishing and the freedom that entails was really appealing. I learnt so much at i-D, it wasn’t just a job, and it was more like family at a pivotal time in my life. I still think of Terry and Tricia Jones, the founders of i-D, as my second parents. After seven years it was time for a new challenge and I had always wanted to experience work within the incredible world of Condé Nast. The thought of bridging the gap between the mainstream and counter-culture always appeals to me. I was very proud of the work we achieved there: commissioning Inez and Vinoodh to shoot James Franco as Adam Ant, Juergen Teller to go to Noma, the best restaurant in the world, Alasdair McLellan to shoot One Direction’s first ever editorial, Harmony Korine to shoot his first ever fashion story, pairing Gus Van Sant with the genius stylist Panos Yiapanis and Terry Richardson shooting the guys from Game of Thrones, Breaking Bad and Sons of Anarchy to celebrate a golden age of TV. My final cover was Pharrell just on the stratospheric upturn of his career, wearing Jake and Dinos Chapman for Kim Jones at Louis Vuitton with cover graphics by Fergadelic–the designer who I currently work with at Man About Town. These were all big moments and felt genuinely exciting to broker under the GQ banner.

But I have an independent aesthetic at heart and a deep-rooted love of the young and the new, all of which can be fully realised at Man About Town. The only constraints here are what I can make happen. From issue 1, it was about turning a good, functioning magazine into something relevant and vital. Brooklyn Beckham’s first ever, editorial story was a punt I wanted to take for my first cover. I loved the idea of the words ‘Man’ and ‘Boy’ written closely together on the cover, extending the remit of how menswear was delivered editorially. The punt paid off–those images went global, featured across the global news media, on talk shows and breakfast TV. They set a news agenda for a week, something you can’t often do at a fashion magazine. It was just a boy in a school uniform, but it delivered a very explicit fashion message that was British, simple, elegant and in tune with its times. Sometimes the pressure is daunting, but I purposefully wanted to open a door into a new vocabulary in menswear.

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S: Can you describe to me any cultural drifts, things more substantial than a trend, that may be informing some of what you put into the magazine in terms of content and talent?

B: I attend the fashion shows each season in London, Florence, Milan then finishing in Paris. These are when buyers, editors, stylists and journalists see the clothes and concepts we will be working with the following season, which we then have to digest, process and translate to the reader. The way that I work is very instinctive. I rely on my cultural awareness and set a theme accordingly. The team then tries to understand my random thought process and hopefully incorporates fashion into something wider and more meaningful than a selection of garments. A lot of care and thought goes into everything from the graphics to the titles, the teams paired and the journalism. I believe the written word, paired with a great photograph, inspired styling and a brilliant title graphic can be explosive. I believe in printed matter and always will. It’s still the best way of organizing thought when executed correctly.

S: Do you have any process for cultivating your intuitions in this scope – or gathering inspiration?

B: When I was growing up the Internet wasn’t around. It was a time before everything was readily available. So you had to rely on libraries to read books, charity shops for clothes and markets for records and fanzines. The first fashion magazine that I actually bought was Kurt Cobain on the cover of The Face. I was going on holiday with my mum and dad and it was in the airport. I was 14, at the awkward age when you hate everything. I was in a hot country and stayed in the shadows, reading that magazine from cover to cover time and time again. Seeing fashion photography for the first time blew my mind. You pick at the seams of culture now and things fall apart. The only thing we have left in an age of shared information and aesthetic overload is the intimate specifics of someone’s taste. I try to hang a lot of those thoughts together in magazines because that feels like their magic to me.

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S: Reading and looking at your work, I get a feeling that your intentions are to produce work that feels more regional and colloquial. That there’s value in that context. Have you ever thought about this?   

B: The previous issue of MAT was specifically themed around the idea Is Britain Still Great? It was put together at a shifting, scary, weird time politically in Britain and we wanted to address it. We spent the summer travelling around the UK, finding beauty and interest in small local stories and tackling politics along the way. There was a genuine feeling back in the office when we assembled the stories that we’d achieved something more thoughtful than just another magazine about menswear. To care and to give something depth resonates more, hopefully. We chose Jack O’Connell as the cover star as for me he represents a particular British localism, albeit one that is translating to a world stage. He’s the handsome wag who lives down the street that just happens to be super-talented. He’s won a Bafta and bagged a Prada campaign whilst the magazine is still on the shelves. Again, we felt like he said something more than just being a nice face in nice clothes.

S: Where did you grow up and what were you interested in as a boy? 

B: I grew up in Newport, South Wales. When I was growing up everyone was in a band. NME labelled Newport the new Seattle. Donna from Elastica went to my school. Everyone drank at the local club called, The Legendary TJs, where Kurt Cobain proposed to Courtney Love and the Manic Street Preachers hung out. TJ’s was pivotal to me in every way. Dressing up and getting the bus into town was an event there. My sister loved The Smiths and Morrissey, so Morrissey has always been a constant throughout my life. We listened to Hatful of Hollow in my dad’s car, cut out posters from magazines to paper her walls with and I wore her boy-sucking-a-lollipop Smiths tee for my non-uniform day in Junior School. When I was aged 14, Morrissey played support to David Bowie in Cardiff, I was so excited I puked all over myself. So, Morrissey. It has always been Morrissey. And it will always be Morrissey. Who else is there?

S: Have you ever had any odd jobs?

B: The jobs I did like stacking shelves and working in an off-license were to supplement me doing work placement at magazines whilst studying at Art College. I met Rachel Newsome, who was then Editor at Dazed and Confused, and worked there for a year, editing the Eye Spy pages at the front of the book, previously edited by Nicola Formichetti. Katy England and Alister Mackie would visit the office and it would be a sensation seeing in person people who I had studied the work of for so long. A job at i-D was advertised in the Guardian. I applied, was interviewed by Terry Jones, got the job and later became editor.

S: Are there any personal obsessions that you inject into your work? I know you’re wild about at least a few things.

B: Morrissey and David Lynch are the two constants. They’re there in pretty much everything I do, explicitly or implicitly. They informed my taste at a crucial age. You can never run away from that.

S: I think you’re really great at pairing talent, sometimes finding obscure fixings. What’s your objective when building the team for a project?

B: It has to be more than just a model, a photograph and some clothes. It goes back to people caring. I value knowledge and intuition. The people I collaborate with are experts in their fields. You can’t force someone to take a picture otherwise it becomes so bland and catalogue. I think when worlds collide and things clash, then you get brilliant results. The high and the low is always a tense, interesting mix.

S: Who would be your dream team?

B: I’m lucky to say that I only work with people I love and admire. Having said that, I would love to meet and work with Bruce Weber one day. The world he creates with his pictures is one I would love to inhabit.

S: Are there any models you would use over and over again?

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B: I love Lara Stone. Her face and attitude evokes European cinema and she always creates an interesting character. She can turn from submissive to aggressive, from sex to restrained in the curl of a lip or furrow of her brow. And she is, when all’s said and done, a breathtaking beauty.

S: Especially for this previous issue of Man About Town, you worked closely with Alasdair McLellan. What are your favorite elements of his work in-and-out of the fashion medium?

B: It’s very personal with Alasdair, we trust each other. It’s a pleasure to work with him. It’s not just taking a fashion image; it’s about finding talent, an oddness, a narrative and a story. We share very similar references and Alasdair knows pop culture like nobody I have ever met. He has an encyclopedic knowledge of obscure facts and figures related to the charts, 60s kitchen sink dramas, Morrissey lyrics, scenes in Star Wars and he uses this to create characters in a world that is just his. And he makes it all seem so effortless. His pictures look like beautiful stills from the most amazing film you have never seen. It’s always very British, sometimes dour and with a touch of sadness, but always with great elegance and sophistication. His expert hand is like no other and I am beyond proud to call him my friend.

S: Has the British aesthetic resurged in prevalence?

B: There’s a new wave of super exciting image makers coming through in London, as an editor, it’s an exciting time with a host of new photographers and stylists to collaborate with. They all share some esoteric similarities, making work that is very personal, arty, weird, wrong, sexual, staged, sincere and very British. I guess it’s the first time since Alasdair that we’re watching a new wave coming through which is always inspiring to see.

S: How has the landscape of the fashion industry, men’s in particular, changed over the last decade?

B: There’s a lot more of it and it’s gotten much busier, with London Collections Men’s added to the schedule and now New York Men’s fashion week being spoken of. The process of editing so much visual information down to a coherent thought has become even more of the most beautiful headache.

S: What’s your favorite film?

B: Star Wars. Always.

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All 4 covers, Bjorn by Alasdair McLellan (Art Partner) /  Styling by Olivier Rizzo

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Shane and Hamish Frew by Alasdair McLellan (Art Partner) /  Styling by Olivier Rizzo / Hair by Matt Mulhall (Streeters London) / Makeup by Ninni Nummela (Streeters London)

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Photography by Mike O’Meally

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Michael by Alasdair McLellan (Art Partner) / Hair by Malcolm Edwards (Art Partner) / Makeup by Lynsey Alexander (Streeters London)

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Harry by Letty Schmiterlow / Styling by Danny Reed

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Finnlay Davis by Jamie Hawkesworth / Styling by Jonathan Anderson / Hair and grooming by Gary Gill

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Hugo, Jules and Marko at Rebel by Gosha Rubchinskiy / Styling by Lotta Volkova Adam (New York: ArtList NY, Paris: ArtList Paris) / Hair and grooming by Gary Gill

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Jeremie Renier by Willy Vanderperre (Art + Commerce) / Hair by Anthony Turner (Art Partner) /  Grooming by Lynsey Alexander (Streeters London)

Posted in: General news

The New Gen

March 27th, 2015 |Posted by Irene Ojo-Felix

The spring issue of i-D is dedicated to Generation Z and the creatives that use their platform to promote positive change in the world. Shot by Willy Vanderperre (Art + Commerce) cover model Natalie Westling gives a 90s grunge aura in an oversized camouflage jacket and minimal makeup on the latest cover of i-D‘s magazine. Flame-haired, self-proclaimed “tomboy” Westling talks with a poise beyond her 18 years about LGBT rights and maintaining her cool while working in the industry.

The newest generation of exciting faces are on the forefront with editorials starring Lida Fox & Karolin Wolter. Take a look at some the images below and figure out “what do you stand for?”

All photos courtesy of i-D. To see more visit i-D.com

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Natalie Westling, photographer Willy Vanderperre (Art + Commerce), fashion director Alastair McKimm (Art + Commerce), hair Duffy (Streeters London), makeup Lynsey Alexander (Streeters London), nail technician Charlene Coquard (Paris: ArtList Paris, New York: ArtList NY), casting Angus Munro for AM Casting (Los Angeles: Streeters Los Angeles, New York: Streeters New York)

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Karolin Wolter (image 1: Balmain, Commes des Garcons, MSGM, Yohji Yamamoto, Givenchy by Riccardo Tisci stud; image 2: Craig Green, Lanvin, Sonia Rykiel, Emilio Cavallini, Katherine Hamnett) photographer Christian MacDonald, styling Jacob K (Streeters London), hair Luke Hersheson, makeup Petros Petrohilos (Streeters London), casting Angus Munro for AM Casting (Los Angeles: Streeters Los Angeles, New York: Streeters New York)

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Lida Fox all in Celine, bodysuit by Wolford, Roe Ethridge, styling Marie Chaix (Art Partner), hair Jordan M, makeup Seong Hee Park, nail technician Elena Capo, lighting Chris Bisagni, production Felix Frith

Posted in: General news

Spring Forward

March 24th, 2015 |Posted by jonathanshia

Hercules Universal celebrates the “Endless Affair” with their latest issue, offering a clean and crisp vision of Spring/Summer 2015. Four black-and-white covers kick it off, featuring English actor Jeremy Irvine by Ben Weller, French rocker Marlon Magnée by Hedi Slimane, and models Alessio Pozzi and Austin Scoggin by, respectively, Daniel Riera and Bruno Staub. Social-media sensation Lucky Blue Smith stars in a vivid feature by Giampaolo Sgura, while Pozzi and Arran Sly look sharp in summer whites by Riera. Felix Gesnouin stars in an introspective story from Philippe Vogelenzang, and another editorial by Sgura peeks at the artistic life.

Staub’s collections feature, shot on Fire Island in gorgeous monochrome, features a passel of summer-ready Soul Artist Management faces, including Doug Pickett, Blaine Cook, Sean Harju, Brian Shimansky, Henry Watkins and Cory Bond, all of whom also appear in an accompanying video, premiering here on Models.com. Take a look at an exclusive preview of the issue below.

IMPRESSIVE ENCOUNTER from HERCULES UNIVERSAL on Vimeo.

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Photographer Daniel Riera (Jed Root), fashion editor Francesco Sourigues (De Facto), model Alessio Pozzi

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Photographer Ben Weller (Camilla Lowther Management), fashion editor David Vivirido, talent Jeremy Irvine

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Photographer Hedi Slimane, model Marlon Magnée

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Photographer Bruno Staub (Chris Boals Artists CBA), fashion editor David Vivirido, modelAustin Scoggins

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Photographer Hedi Slimane, model Marlon Magnée

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Photographer Giampaolo Sgura (Paris: ArtList Paris, New York: ArtList NY), fashion editor Miguel Arnau (Paris: ArtList Paris, New York: ArtList NY), model Ryan Tift, Aiden Shaw, second image Jacob Hankin

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Photographer Daniel Riera (Jed Root), fashion editor Francesco Sourigues (De Facto), model Alessio Pozzi, Arran Sly

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Photographer Bruno Staub (Chris Boals Artists CBA), fashion editor David Vivirido, model Minkah Davidson, second image Brian Shimansky, Max Wefers

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Photographer Giampaolo Sgura (Paris: ArtList Paris, New York: ArtList NY), fashion editor Miguel Arnau (Paris: ArtList Paris, New York: ArtList NY), model Lucky Blue Smith

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Photographer Ben Weller (Camilla Lowther Management), fashion editor David Vivirido, talent Jeremy Irvine

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Photographer Philippe Vogelenzang (Jed Root), fashion editor Darcy Backlar (Management + Artists), model Felix Gesnouin

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Photographer Mark Kean, fashion editor Way Perry (Jed Root) model Felix Morriss

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Photographer Thomas Goldblum, fashion editor Azza Yousif, model Aaron Gatward

Posted in: boys,General news

The Lady is a Vamp

March 20th, 2015 |Posted by jonathanshia

The biannual Vamp—cheekily subtitled “a magazine about women on top”—celebrates its first birthday with the release of the new Spring 2015 issue, complete with four powerful covers, starring Versus’ new creative director Anthony Vaccarello with his muse Mica Arganaraz, along with Hilary Rhoda, Jessica Miller, and Drake Burnette with David Agbodji. Dedicated to powerful women, the magazine brings together art, fashion, and culture, with features on the painter Anh Duong and the actress and muse Rossy De Palma. Miller amps up the sex appeal while Burnette and Agbodji offer a sculptural look at the season’s sharpest collections. Take a look at an exclusive preview of the new issue below.

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Drake Burnette and David Agbodji by Paola Kudacki (Camilla Lowther Management), styling by Elizabeth Sulcer (Lalaland Artists)

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Anthony Vaccarello and Mica Arganaraz by Nico (Paris: ArtList Paris, New York: ArtList NY, Berlin: Shotview Photographers Management), styling by Barbara Martelo

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Hilary Rhoda by Bruno Staub (Chris Boals Artists CBA), styling by David Vivirido

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Jessica Miller by Santiago & Mauricio Sierra (Cadence New York), styling by Elizabeth Sulcer (Lalaland Artists)

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Othilia Simon

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Steffy Argelich

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Posted in: General news

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