The Company You Keep

May 26th, 2015 |Posted by steven.yatsko

In celebration of i-D Magazine’s 35th birthday Alasdair McLellan (Art Partner) shoots a league of winking models, 18 to be exact, from the industry’s North Stars like Kate Moss, Malgosia BelaLara Stone and newly minted super Jourdan Dunn to a crop of next of kin muses like Anna Ewers, Natalie Westling and Grace Hartzel. The British photographer who is known for his pared down approach had his career launched by the iconic publication after his work caught the eye of stylist Simon Foxton. Since then he’s been part of the I-D family, so having him shoot the entire summer issue front to back seems a befitting concept. Surely fans of Alasdair McLellan’s work are already drooling.

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Kate Moss, Fashion Director Alastair McKimm (Art + Commerce)

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Edie Campbell, Styling Benjamin Bruno (Art + Commerce)

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Daria Werbowy, Fashion Director Alastair McKimm (Art + Commerce)

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Anna Ewers, Styling Francesca Burns

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Freja Beha Erichsen, Fashion Director Alastair McKimm (Art + Commerce)

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Jourdan Dunn, Styling Edward Enninful (Art + Commerce)

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Stella Tennant, Styling Benjamin Bruno (Art + Commerce)

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Grace Hartzel, Styling Olivier Rizzo

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Natalie Westling, Styling Olivier Rizzo

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Malgosia Bela, Styling Jane How (Art Partner)

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Karly Loyce, Styling Marie Chaix (Art Partner)

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Adrienne Jüliger, Styling Olivier Rizzo

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Greta Varlese, Styling Olivier Rizzo

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Tyler Littlejohns, Styling Benjamin Bruno (Art + Commerce)

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Rianne van Rompaey, Styling Jane How (Art Partner)

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Lara Stone, Styling Olivier Rizzo

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Damaris Goddrie, Styling Marie Chaix (Art Partner)

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Jean Campbell, Styling Benjamin Bruno (Art + Commerce)

Posted in: General news

I am Legend

April 27th, 2015 |Posted by steven.yatsko

For Vogue Brasil’s fortieth birthday, they laud none other than their own Brazilian legend, Gisele Bundchen. Though she walked her last show in the recent São Paolo Fashion Week, ending 20 years on the runway, the mega-model and mother continues to raise her fabled career to even more illustrious proportions. The cover shot by Inez van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin puts an unclothed and statuesque Gisele on a pedestal looking absolutely immortal. A very apropos choice.

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Photographer Inez van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin | Creative Director Giovanni Bianco | Hair Didier Malige (Art Partner) | Makeup Dick Page (Jed Root)

Posted in: General news

Through the Looking Glass

April 13th, 2015 |Posted by Irene Ojo-Felix

With an aura as ethereal as the coming spring breeze, Julia Nobis poses for the latest issue of Interview Magazine and the Spring 2015 Sacai campaign, the first for the cutting edge brand (finally out in print). Here she shows her effortless range appealing to both editorial and commercial audiences with her exquisitely beautiful presence and quirkiness. Teaming up for the two projects with photographer, Craig McDean, and super-stylist, Karl Templer, has resulted in inspiring harmony.

For Interview, Nobis brings the audience through the looking-glass, however cracked and tarnished it may be, to view the latest couture fashion from John Galliano‘s first creation for Maison Martin Margiela to Valentino‘s gilded wares.

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Interview Magazine
Craig McDean (Art + Commerce) – Photographer, Karl Templer (Streeters London) – Fashion Editor/Stylist, Eugene Souleiman (Streeters London) – Hair Stylist, Mark Carrasquillo (Art Partner) – Makeup Artist, Yuko Tsuchihashi – Manicurist, Julia Nobis – Model

For Sacai Spring/Summer 2015, Nobis shows that she has no trouble wearing Chitose Abe’s bold creations that have a penchant towards peculiarly blending design elements far from safe.

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Sacai Spring/Summer 2015
Craig McDean (Art + Commerce) – Photographer, Karl Templer (Streeters London) – Fashion Editor/Stylist, Tomo Jidai (Streeters London) – Hair Stylist, Megumi Yamamoto – Manicurist, Julia Nobis – Model

Posted in: General news

Spring into Season

April 7th, 2015 |Posted by Irene Ojo-Felix

Tami Williams shows off her svelte figure in the new lanky, calf length skirts of the Spring season. Shot by Craig McDean and styled by Grace Coddington, Tami effortlessly adopts the modern silhouette of these runway looks with poise and charming appeal. With ruffled hems and accordion pleats, James Pecis and Aaron de Mey add their magic to the fresh evolution of the contemporary woman.

For more pick up the April issue of American Vogue on newsstands now!

Photographer Craig McDean (Art + Commerce), fashion editor Grace Coddington, hair James Pecis (New York: D + V Management, London: D + V Management ), New York: D + V Management) with makeup Aaron de Mey (Art Partner).

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Posted in: General news

A New Hope

April 1st, 2015 |Posted by steven.yatsko

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As Man About Town, the bi-annual men’s fashion and lifestyle publication, releases its Spring/Summer 2015 issue tomorrow entitled A NEW HOPE, one gets the feeling this new generation is predestined to set the stage for a social renaissance. On the multiple covers shot by Alasdair McLellan a prepossessing Bjorn stands semi-gawk semi-sophisticate with styling by Olivier Rizzo that is democratic in its androgyny. For the issue, the exclusive previews of AW 15 Gucci, J.W. Anderson, Raf Simons, and Prada match MAT’s pitch perfect breed of meta-decadal fingerprinting.

We spoke to Ben Reardon, the editor-in-chief of Man About Town, recently to get personal insight and some cultural forecasting. After a stint at British GQ Style and i-D before that, he’s found familiar terra firma at Man –the independent magazine world being a language more native to him.  Ben understands that the the editor’s compass is always shifting following cultural zeitgeists. 

Photos courtesy of Man About Town

S: We met while you were at British GQ Style, and before then it was I-D. Now you’re the editor-in-chief of Man About Town. What attracted you there?

B: The idea of a return to independent publishing and the freedom that entails was really appealing. I learnt so much at i-D, it wasn’t just a job, and it was more like family at a pivotal time in my life. I still think of Terry and Tricia Jones, the founders of i-D, as my second parents. After seven years it was time for a new challenge and I had always wanted to experience work within the incredible world of Condé Nast. The thought of bridging the gap between the mainstream and counter-culture always appeals to me. I was very proud of the work we achieved there: commissioning Inez and Vinoodh to shoot James Franco as Adam Ant, Juergen Teller to go to Noma, the best restaurant in the world, Alasdair McLellan to shoot One Direction’s first ever editorial, Harmony Korine to shoot his first ever fashion story, pairing Gus Van Sant with the genius stylist Panos Yiapanis and Terry Richardson shooting the guys from Game of Thrones, Breaking Bad and Sons of Anarchy to celebrate a golden age of TV. My final cover was Pharrell just on the stratospheric upturn of his career, wearing Jake and Dinos Chapman for Kim Jones at Louis Vuitton with cover graphics by Fergadelic–the designer who I currently work with at Man About Town. These were all big moments and felt genuinely exciting to broker under the GQ banner.

But I have an independent aesthetic at heart and a deep-rooted love of the young and the new, all of which can be fully realised at Man About Town. The only constraints here are what I can make happen. From issue 1, it was about turning a good, functioning magazine into something relevant and vital. Brooklyn Beckham’s first ever, editorial story was a punt I wanted to take for my first cover. I loved the idea of the words ‘Man’ and ‘Boy’ written closely together on the cover, extending the remit of how menswear was delivered editorially. The punt paid off–those images went global, featured across the global news media, on talk shows and breakfast TV. They set a news agenda for a week, something you can’t often do at a fashion magazine. It was just a boy in a school uniform, but it delivered a very explicit fashion message that was British, simple, elegant and in tune with its times. Sometimes the pressure is daunting, but I purposefully wanted to open a door into a new vocabulary in menswear.

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S: Can you describe to me any cultural drifts, things more substantial than a trend, that may be informing some of what you put into the magazine in terms of content and talent?

B: I attend the fashion shows each season in London, Florence, Milan then finishing in Paris. These are when buyers, editors, stylists and journalists see the clothes and concepts we will be working with the following season, which we then have to digest, process and translate to the reader. The way that I work is very instinctive. I rely on my cultural awareness and set a theme accordingly. The team then tries to understand my random thought process and hopefully incorporates fashion into something wider and more meaningful than a selection of garments. A lot of care and thought goes into everything from the graphics to the titles, the teams paired and the journalism. I believe the written word, paired with a great photograph, inspired styling and a brilliant title graphic can be explosive. I believe in printed matter and always will. It’s still the best way of organizing thought when executed correctly.

S: Do you have any process for cultivating your intuitions in this scope – or gathering inspiration?

B: When I was growing up the Internet wasn’t around. It was a time before everything was readily available. So you had to rely on libraries to read books, charity shops for clothes and markets for records and fanzines. The first fashion magazine that I actually bought was Kurt Cobain on the cover of The Face. I was going on holiday with my mum and dad and it was in the airport. I was 14, at the awkward age when you hate everything. I was in a hot country and stayed in the shadows, reading that magazine from cover to cover time and time again. Seeing fashion photography for the first time blew my mind. You pick at the seams of culture now and things fall apart. The only thing we have left in an age of shared information and aesthetic overload is the intimate specifics of someone’s taste. I try to hang a lot of those thoughts together in magazines because that feels like their magic to me.

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S: Reading and looking at your work, I get a feeling that your intentions are to produce work that feels more regional and colloquial. That there’s value in that context. Have you ever thought about this?   

B: The previous issue of MAT was specifically themed around the idea Is Britain Still Great? It was put together at a shifting, scary, weird time politically in Britain and we wanted to address it. We spent the summer travelling around the UK, finding beauty and interest in small local stories and tackling politics along the way. There was a genuine feeling back in the office when we assembled the stories that we’d achieved something more thoughtful than just another magazine about menswear. To care and to give something depth resonates more, hopefully. We chose Jack O’Connell as the cover star as for me he represents a particular British localism, albeit one that is translating to a world stage. He’s the handsome wag who lives down the street that just happens to be super-talented. He’s won a Bafta and bagged a Prada campaign whilst the magazine is still on the shelves. Again, we felt like he said something more than just being a nice face in nice clothes.

S: Where did you grow up and what were you interested in as a boy? 

B: I grew up in Newport, South Wales. When I was growing up everyone was in a band. NME labelled Newport the new Seattle. Donna from Elastica went to my school. Everyone drank at the local club called, The Legendary TJs, where Kurt Cobain proposed to Courtney Love and the Manic Street Preachers hung out. TJ’s was pivotal to me in every way. Dressing up and getting the bus into town was an event there. My sister loved The Smiths and Morrissey, so Morrissey has always been a constant throughout my life. We listened to Hatful of Hollow in my dad’s car, cut out posters from magazines to paper her walls with and I wore her boy-sucking-a-lollipop Smiths tee for my non-uniform day in Junior School. When I was aged 14, Morrissey played support to David Bowie in Cardiff, I was so excited I puked all over myself. So, Morrissey. It has always been Morrissey. And it will always be Morrissey. Who else is there?

S: Have you ever had any odd jobs?

B: The jobs I did like stacking shelves and working in an off-license were to supplement me doing work placement at magazines whilst studying at Art College. I met Rachel Newsome, who was then Editor at Dazed and Confused, and worked there for a year, editing the Eye Spy pages at the front of the book, previously edited by Nicola Formichetti. Katy England and Alister Mackie would visit the office and it would be a sensation seeing in person people who I had studied the work of for so long. A job at i-D was advertised in the Guardian. I applied, was interviewed by Terry Jones, got the job and later became editor.

S: Are there any personal obsessions that you inject into your work? I know you’re wild about at least a few things.

B: Morrissey and David Lynch are the two constants. They’re there in pretty much everything I do, explicitly or implicitly. They informed my taste at a crucial age. You can never run away from that.

S: I think you’re really great at pairing talent, sometimes finding obscure fixings. What’s your objective when building the team for a project?

B: It has to be more than just a model, a photograph and some clothes. It goes back to people caring. I value knowledge and intuition. The people I collaborate with are experts in their fields. You can’t force someone to take a picture otherwise it becomes so bland and catalogue. I think when worlds collide and things clash, then you get brilliant results. The high and the low is always a tense, interesting mix.

S: Who would be your dream team?

B: I’m lucky to say that I only work with people I love and admire. Having said that, I would love to meet and work with Bruce Weber one day. The world he creates with his pictures is one I would love to inhabit.

S: Are there any models you would use over and over again?

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B: I love Lara Stone. Her face and attitude evokes European cinema and she always creates an interesting character. She can turn from submissive to aggressive, from sex to restrained in the curl of a lip or furrow of her brow. And she is, when all’s said and done, a breathtaking beauty.

S: Especially for this previous issue of Man About Town, you worked closely with Alasdair McLellan. What are your favorite elements of his work in-and-out of the fashion medium?

B: It’s very personal with Alasdair, we trust each other. It’s a pleasure to work with him. It’s not just taking a fashion image; it’s about finding talent, an oddness, a narrative and a story. We share very similar references and Alasdair knows pop culture like nobody I have ever met. He has an encyclopedic knowledge of obscure facts and figures related to the charts, 60s kitchen sink dramas, Morrissey lyrics, scenes in Star Wars and he uses this to create characters in a world that is just his. And he makes it all seem so effortless. His pictures look like beautiful stills from the most amazing film you have never seen. It’s always very British, sometimes dour and with a touch of sadness, but always with great elegance and sophistication. His expert hand is like no other and I am beyond proud to call him my friend.

S: Has the British aesthetic resurged in prevalence?

B: There’s a new wave of super exciting image makers coming through in London, as an editor, it’s an exciting time with a host of new photographers and stylists to collaborate with. They all share some esoteric similarities, making work that is very personal, arty, weird, wrong, sexual, staged, sincere and very British. I guess it’s the first time since Alasdair that we’re watching a new wave coming through which is always inspiring to see.

S: How has the landscape of the fashion industry, men’s in particular, changed over the last decade?

B: There’s a lot more of it and it’s gotten much busier, with London Collections Men’s added to the schedule and now New York Men’s fashion week being spoken of. The process of editing so much visual information down to a coherent thought has become even more of the most beautiful headache.

S: What’s your favorite film?

B: Star Wars. Always.

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All 4 covers, Bjorn by Alasdair McLellan (Art Partner) /  Styling by Olivier Rizzo

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Shane and Hamish Frew by Alasdair McLellan (Art Partner) /  Styling by Olivier Rizzo / Hair by Matt Mulhall (Streeters London) / Makeup by Ninni Nummela (Streeters London)

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Photography by Mike O’Meally

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Michael by Alasdair McLellan (Art Partner) / Hair by Malcolm Edwards (Art Partner) / Makeup by Lynsey Alexander (Streeters London)

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Harry by Letty Schmiterlow / Styling by Danny Reed

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Finnlay Davis by Jamie Hawkesworth / Styling by Jonathan Anderson / Hair and grooming by Gary Gill

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Hugo, Jules and Marko at Rebel by Gosha Rubchinskiy / Styling by Lotta Volkova Adam (New York: ArtList NY, Paris: ArtList Paris) / Hair and grooming by Gary Gill

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Jeremie Renier by Willy Vanderperre (Art + Commerce) / Hair by Anthony Turner (Art Partner) /  Grooming by Lynsey Alexander (Streeters London)

Posted in: General news

Monrowe Magazine

March 30th, 2015 |Posted by steven.yatsko

Monrowe Magazine introduces its first issue “Evolution” chronicling a certain and beautiful bygone sentiment, like the antiquity of good penmanship, with editor Ricky Kim ruminating over timelessness, an answer to button-down minimalism and his own longing for substance. “The best art gives us a feeling to which we have no words…for me, personally, cinema has been the most powerful,” says Kim, a former photography art director with Ralph Lauren. The predominately black and white pages infuse that savor of cinema onto its silvery pages. The cover story shot by Fanny Latour-Lambert musters nostalgia and the perennial cool of James Dean. Glen Luchford’s masterfully filmic Prada 1997 campaigns featuring Amber Valletta are resurrected and still read as contemporary and sensory-charged as ever embracing silver-screen virtues.

By keeping storytelling at the forefront, photographers like Robert NetheryChantelle Dosser and Annelise Phillips mull over fashion with dreamy cinematic images. Lindsey Hornyak styles contemplatively synthesizing the new and old while Priscilla Polley keeps thing feeling traditional such as in “The Good Place” with Alina Krasina and Alexandra Titarenko wearing A.P.C., Creatures of Comfort and Stella Mcartney. Iconic art photographer Ralph Gibson‘s narrative body of work is featured in a retrospective as well as an interview with model/legend Kim Williams wearing Issey Miyake.

Photos courtesy of Monrowe Magazine

Adeline Jouan by Fanny Latour-Lambert (Walter Schupfer Management), styling by Lindsey Hornyak

 

Prada campaigns from 1997-Amber Valletta by Glen Luchford (Art Partner), creative direction by David James (Art + Commerce)

 

Paul Barge, Augustin Lampreia and Adeline Jouan by Fanny Latour-Lambert (Walter Schupfer Management), styled by Lindsey Hornyak

Alina Krasina and Sarah Bledsoe by Annelise Phillips, styled by Priscilla Polley

Alina Ilie, Carson Bruner and Katiusha Feofanova by Chantelle Dosser, styled by Priscilla Polley

Shaughnessy Brown, Haley Rohe and Zach King by Michael Donovan, styled by Priscilla Polley

 

Charlotte ReboutierRyan Hassaine and Angie Sherbourne by Fanny Latour-Lambert (Walter Schupfer Management), creative direction by Lindsey Hornyak

Stills from Matt Baron

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Elliott Sailors, Viktoriya Sasonkina, Olga Timokhina, Elena Melnik, Rhianna Porter and Sup Park by Chantelle Dosser, styled by Lindsey Hornyak

Kim Williams by Marco Grob, styled by Priscilla Polley

 

Photography by Ralph Gibson (Walter Schupfer Management)

Marko Brozic by Nathan Jenkins, styled by Mara Palena

 

Posted in: General news

The New Gen

March 27th, 2015 |Posted by Irene Ojo-Felix

The spring issue of i-D is dedicated to Generation Z and the creatives that use their platform to promote positive change in the world. Shot by Willy Vanderperre (Art + Commerce) cover model Natalie Westling gives a 90s grunge aura in an oversized camouflage jacket and minimal makeup on the latest cover of i-D‘s magazine. Flame-haired, self-proclaimed “tomboy” Westling talks with a poise beyond her 18 years about LGBT rights and maintaining her cool while working in the industry.

The newest generation of exciting faces are on the forefront with editorials starring Lida Fox & Karolin Wolter. Take a look at some the images below and figure out “what do you stand for?”

All photos courtesy of i-D. To see more visit i-D.com

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Natalie Westling, photographer Willy Vanderperre (Art + Commerce), fashion director Alastair McKimm (Art + Commerce), hair Duffy (Streeters London), makeup Lynsey Alexander (Streeters London), nail technician Charlene Coquard (Paris: ArtList Paris, New York: ArtList NY), casting Angus Munro for AM Casting (Los Angeles: Streeters Los Angeles, New York: Streeters New York)

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Karolin Wolter (image 1: Balmain, Commes des Garcons, MSGM, Yohji Yamamoto, Givenchy by Riccardo Tisci stud; image 2: Craig Green, Lanvin, Sonia Rykiel, Emilio Cavallini, Katherine Hamnett) photographer Christian MacDonald, styling Jacob K (Streeters London), hair Luke Hersheson, makeup Petros Petrohilos (Streeters London), casting Angus Munro for AM Casting (Los Angeles: Streeters Los Angeles, New York: Streeters New York)

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Lida Fox all in Celine, bodysuit by Wolford, Roe Ethridge, styling Marie Chaix (Art Partner), hair Jordan M, makeup Seong Hee Park, nail technician Elena Capo, lighting Chris Bisagni, production Felix Frith

Posted in: General news

Jackets Required

March 25th, 2015 |Posted by steven.yatsko

Fashion’s preoccupation with the seventies becomes the ideé fixe for W Magazine’s new Mario Sorrenti shoot that highlights Saint Laurent muse Grace Hartzel alongside a bleached blonde Jaime Ross. Melanie Ward adopts the glamrock eclecticism of Slimane’s LA playground and the story’s creed: “Jackets required. The rest is at your discretion” means there’s no room for staid convention. On that note, Ward styles the duo into disparate, beatnik-chic playmates mixing in plenty of Saint Laurent. Aaron de Mey adds a touch of mod focusing on bold lashes and James Pecis tousles their hair to appear as unattended to as their abandoned hideout. See the full editorial out on newsstands right now.

Check out more from the April issue on wmagazine.com.

Photographer Mario Sorrenti (Art Partner), fashion editor Melanie Ward (Art Partner), hair James Pecis (London: D + V Management , New York: D + V Management) Aaron de Mey (Art Partner)

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Posted in: General news

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